Different moods of Pyhä-Luosto National Park

One of my favourite places in the world is Pyhä-Luosto National Park. Fells are all that is left of ancient mountains. Although Pyhä-Luosto is a skiresort with extensive winter activities, I think the most magical time to visit this park is Summer or Autumn. Here are a few pictures that I have taken over the years.

Snow blowers working.

Autumn is the time of mystics. Fog and bright colors are great reasons to spend a few days in Pyhä-Luosto.

Sometimes the light almost gets through

Beautiful fall colours and Pyhänkasteenputous waterfall

Silently waiting

On the other hand in the summer there is light 24 hours a day. Lapland’s summer is swift but bright. Make sure you are not visiting Lapland during “räkkä” a.k.a. the worst mosquito time. End of July and August are great for hiking and mosquitos won’t bother you too much.

Between fells there is a paradise

Uhriharju lookout during summer

Midnight view on top of Pyhätunturi fell

Moonlight reveals foggy terrain

Of course in Lapland you will run into reindeer. Some times the clouds are so low that the only clear place is on top of the fells.

The Alfa and the herd

Above the clouds

Midnight sun, as they call it, is the opposite of polar night. Basically summer is light and winter is dark. Very dark and cold. There are sunlight only for a few hours a day, maybe not even that.

Sunset turning to sunrise

Ancient mountains have been swiped away by ice ages and erosion. This is what is left of the majestic mountains.

Old stones

Mystical autumn

Isokuru gorge during summer

 

Koli national park is one of the most mythical places in all of Finland

The Mighty Koli has been regarded as a sacred area in which the mighty spirits lived. As the area was feared for its powerful spirits, it was inhabited only in the mid 18th century, almost two hundred years later than the surrounding areas. The landscapes in the area are unmatched and thus impressed upon numerous hikers. The Tourist attraction of the area aroused in the late 19th century. It seems that the tradition where a coin will be dropped into an ancient sacrificial crack was also originated around that time.

On the slopes of Koli you will find the longest valley in Finland, ten other famous caves, waterfalls, devils, boulders and a ridge running in the lake of Pielinen, which is visible on the northern side of the lake in form of line of beautiful narrow islands. So, theretrail‘s sights and adventures for a long time.

Arrival and stay

In order to enjoy the best Koli has to offer, you should book a cottage. There is nothing better than relax on a soft bed after full day of adventures.

Find and book your cabin from Koli >>

The closest Bus stop locates in 9 km from Koli. However, it is easy to get to Koli with your own car or by carpooling.

First time at Koli?

For the first time visitors an absolute must-see is the iconic scenery from the top of Ukko-Koli. It is only 0.8 km hike to the top, and the nearby observation deck can also be accessed with the prams. However, Koli National Park offers a lot more. You can hike the Herajärvi Round, which is 30 or 60 kilometers depending on your preferences. The National Park is full of trail options for both in summer and winter.

  • Route to Ukko- and Akka-Koli both takes only 0.8km in one direction. Both trails starts from the Nature Center are partially accessible with prams.
  • Paha-Koli 1.2km in one direction
  • Top tour is a 1.4km long circle trail. An easy-going classical trail in Koli’s most iconic scenery. Starts from the Visitor Center.
  • Kolinuurros is 3.5 km long circle trail. A Demanding but a spectacular trail with high altitudes.

Explore Koli in winter

  • Trail of the Koli peaks are 3 and 7 km circle ski trails in winter scenery.
  • Snow-Shoeing: The snowshoe route of the highest point, 1.5 km, runs with the peaks of Ukko, Akka and Paha-Koli.
  • Walk: Trail to the top of Ukko-Koli is 400m and starts from the radiotower
  • Ski: Koli’s ski slopes are located near high peaks. Along with the slopes there are plenty of services for the traveler.
  • Snow mobile: The snowmobile route passes through Koli village to Pielinen, which continues to the Juuka, Nurmes, Lieksa and Joensuu. In the national park, snowmobiling is prohibited, including in the islands of the park.

Read more about Koli in English here.

Kingdom of two giant fells: Pyhä-Luosto national park

The Pyhä-Luosto National Park in central Lapland is the kingdom of two giant fells. In the west, the handsome Ukko-Luosto dominates the landscape and in the east stands the ancient Pyhätunturi. There are many other peaks in the area, such as the mythical Noitatunturi, as well as impressive beautiful forests and ponds to fall in love with. The absolute experience for the first time visitor is the incredible Isokuru, one of the most powerful landscapes in Lapland.

Find your cottage at Pyhä-Luosto

Surely you know the wonderful feeling when after an all day trip you can get back into the cozy cottage and chat with the family or friends about the events of the day, while planning the next day’s trips? Comfortable cottage is a great base for hikers!

Cabin gems of the Pyhätunturi are available here >>

You’ll book and find the best cabins of Luosto here >>

Pyhä-Luosto is a versatile hiking area all year round and it is constantly growing popular with snowshoerd and fatbikers. Good routes and fireplaces provide an insight into both day trips and longer hikes.

At the base of Pyhätunturi, there is a wonderful Nature Center Naava, where a lunch restaurant and a souvenir shop are located. There are plenty of services for the needs of various hikers and explorers in the Pyhä and Luosto area. In addition to the versatile equipment rental, you can stroke cute reindeer at the reindeer farm, participate in a husky or snowmobile safari or even try ice climbing.

Easy to acces with public transport

It is easy to reach Pyhä-Luosto with your own car: the car can be left at either Pyhä, Luosto or the parking places between the fells. Trains and flights arriving to Rovaniemi and Kemijärvi have a bus service to Pyhä-Luosto around the year. The bus from both towns to Pyhä and Luosto drives daily. You can find timetables and more information at Matkahuolto’s website. Bus line goes also between the fells. For more information on how to arrive in Pyhä-Luosto you will find here.

First time at Pyhä-Luosto?

The Pyhä-Luosto National Park offers an excellent setting for photographing the northern lights, and you will also be able to get acquainted with Siberian Jays which enjoy the company of hikers. We also recommend to have a snack at Torvisen maja café. It’s a sympathetic café where the peaceful atmosphere is at its place without electricity and running water.

We want to recommend these unbelievably beautiful hiking trails:

  • Karhujuomalampi trail, 10km: The Circle trail is attracted with the impressive Isokuru and the picturesque Pyhäkastelampi. Remember that the entire Isokuru area is a restricted area of the National Park where deviation from the marked route is prohibited!
  • Tunturiaapa natural trail, 5-7km: Circle trail travels across fell and marsh areas and has a bird-watching tower on the way.
  • Noitatunturi, 15km: A demanding circle trail which goes across Isokuru, the waterfall of Pyhäkaste and the bond of Karhunjuomalammi
  • Ukko-Luosto, 6,5km: You can hike around Ukko-Luosto and stop by the top of the fell.

Read more about Pyhä-Luosto national park here.

Photos by Jonna Saari.

The healing power of forests

Those suffering from noise and stress can find an escape in forests. It is proven that sylvan nature reduces stress and blood pressure. Finland offers an excellent opportunity for a change in lifestyle, and its path leads to the forest.

Only five per cent of Finland’s surface area is built. More than 70% of the surface area is forest and 10% water systems. No wonder that enjoying nature is great on a global scale in Finland: more than half of Finns visit summer houses regularly.

As much as 70% of the inhabitants of northern Finland annually visit the nation’s forests to trek or pick berries or mushrooms.

In principle, every Finn has access to a silent forest and a strip of shore where one can be in peace. Foreigners too have noticed this. Tourists seek a counterbalance to their everyday life in Finnish nature destinations. They want peace, quiet and opportunities for nature and aesthetic experiences.

This is difficult in the built urban environment. For example, as much as 75% of Europeans live in an urban environment. Tourists value original nature, clean environment and local culture.

“Aesthetic experiences and the relaxing effect of a green environment lift your mood and help recover from stress,” claims Professor Liisa Tyrväinen of Natural Resources Institute Finland.

Dr. Liisa Tyrväinen has long studied the significance of forests as a producer of well-being. Forests have a great effect on people as a mental, cultural and experiential environment.

Air pollution and exposure to noise, in this order, are the biggest environmental problems for human health according to WHO, the World Health Organisation.

Insufficient recovery from stress raises the blood pressure and increases the risk of diabetes.

Ms. Tyrväinen emphasises that particularly nature areas must be seen as a resource of health care for city dwellers. According to many studies, forests promote both physical and mental well-being.

Large nature areas muffle noise and improve air quality by removing dust and other impurities and by binding ozone and monoxide gases.

It is also proven that an outing in nature and just being there lift the mood. Forests have a great therapeutic significance.

On the basis of studies, one can influence one’s state of health by being and moving in a nature environment. Especially in one’s favourite spot in nature, it is possible to regulate one’s condition towards promoting health.

“According to studies, people experience stronger recovery from stress on pleasant exercise routes often situated in the forest and in larger outdoor exercise areas than in the street and outdoor spaces of city centres mentioned as favourite places.”

Blood pressure falls and  the organs recover in the forest

Tyrväinen’s research group has results measured with heart rate monitors and blood pressure meters on how quickly a nature environment and particularly the forest help recovery from stress.

The measurements and surveys were made with a test group of almost a hundred persons.

“The health benefits of a green environment are evident.

A stressed person recovers quickly in nature. Recovery in a green zone is apparent after just 15 minutes!”

“The results of joint studies made with the Japanese are indisputable. When people were taken into the forest, a decrease in blood pressure and pulse, a reduction in muscular tension and an increase in the activity of the parasympathetic nervous system were observed in the measurement results.”

The parasympathetic nervous system is most active in rest. From the effect of a parasympathetic impulse, the heart rate slows down and respiratory frequency is reduced. Being in the forest has a similar effect on the organs as yoga or meditation. The Finnish forest is a retreat.

People felt more vigorous and even more creative after being in the forest. Liisa Tyrväinen emphasises the aesthetics of nature. Stress is particularly removed by the experience of nature, an unbuilt, beautiful scenery and silence.

Liisa Tyrväinen recommends consciously combining nature experiences and moving in nature with a holiday trip.

It helps recovery from the strains of everyday life. “One nature trip is not enough to heal, but it can be an impetus for a change in lifestyle.”

A nature trip to the Finnish forest offers a holistic health package. It includes multisensory nature experiences, a clean and beautiful environment, outings in nature, accommodation and sauna close to nature, silence and healthy forest products, such as berries, mushrooms, wild vegetables and game.

Article by Visit Finland / Ari Turunen

The largest nationalpark of Finland – Lemmenjoki

In Lemmenjoki national park you can experience the true northern wilderness. One of the biggest wilderness areas in Europe takes place in the municipality of Inari in Lapland, right next to the Norwegian border.

The name Lemmenjoki means “River of Love”. You can start the trip by going to Njurgulahti village where you can get boat rides or rent a canoe.

We went to the river for three days with our canoe to enjoy the autumn foliage of Lapland. Timing was perfect and the colors were unimaginable.

Bog billberrys colored the riverside with red and purple, and the birches took their final breath before the great winter and painted their leaves with yellow and orange.

The fells turned to red and almost golden from mountain bearberry and other shrubs.

The river flows calmly and patiently in here, where time seems to stop.

No matter in which direction you go, there is only true wilderness.

One of the greatest places in the world.

Attract on a Walk or Bike Tour Along Vantaanjoki

Helsinki is full of small gems for short getaways on foot or by bike. One of them is a walk or a bicycle route along Vantaanjoki river that takes you from the oldest of Helsinki to the newest one. Along the way there is plenty; fast rapid and a calm riverside, fields and urban gardening sites, and silence of the woods.
Helsinki was established already in 1550 by the Vanhankaupunginkoski rapid, where the Vantaanjoki (river Vantaa) meets the sea. The centre has later moved to where it is today, but the area still carries its historical charm in the middle of the new residential areas growing on both sides of the river and the Arabianranta arts and design district. From the last stop of the trams 6 and 8, there is only a stone’s throw to the path that takes you along the bayside to the pedestrian bridge nearby the Vanhankaupunginkoski rapid. On a lazy day, the time goes by watching the rapid, the beautiful bay view and locals trying their luck fishing. A stroll along the wooden path takes you to Lammassaari through a small jungle of sea reed. A small island with tiny summer cottages during the summer season is a peaceful hideaway and walkabout during autumn and winter.

On a more active day, take a bike or put your best walking shoes on and save some time. From the rapid, a pedestrian path takes you north towards the direction of Vantaa and Kerava. The path goes on most parts on both side of the river, with small detours to the residential areas of Käpylä, Veräjälaakso and Tapaninvainio among others.

The next pit stop along the path from the Vanhakaupunki is Pikkukoski, a small public beach hiding within Veräjälaakso residential blocks, resting in a small, quiet valley by the Pirunkallio (‘devil’s rock’). In the summer time, Pikkukoski (‘small rapid’) is a small public beach to swim in the Vantaanjoki river. It gathers local residents to picnic, swim, rest in the sun, play basketball or just stop, enjoy and stretch your legs for a while. The Pirunkallio cliffs by the river create an illusion of being much further away in the woods than you actually are. The cranes of the very new Viikinmäki residential area in the background do however remind you of the rapidly growing Helsinki around us.

In the winter time, Pikkukoski transforms into a small, hidden winter activity corner. The steep Pirunkallio cliff offers a rare opportunity in Helsinki to try out ice climbing, if the winter conditions are favourable in the Helsinki latitude for the ice to form – and stay for few months. Pikkukoski offers also an opportunity to try the winter swimming, if you are brave enough.

The pump keeps the hole in the river open throughout the year and dipping into the icy water is easy thanks to the path and stairs installed for the winter swimmers. The small change cubicle on the beach gives a little shelter for changing clothes. If you don’t dare to try the icy bath with all the health benefits, it is a funny marriage to watch: few evenings a week the climbers in their full gore-tex gear and winter swimmers only in their bathing suits share happily the same small lot. During the snowy season, ski tracks are also available in the area.

Continuing towards upstream, the forest view changes to the fields and parks of Tapaninvainio and Tuomarinkylän Kartano Mansion. The path takes you through the area where urban gardeners nurture their small lots in the summer time. You can also hire canoes in the area for further exploration of the river.

The old farm and mansion Tuomarinkylän Kartano mansion and farm area makes a nice stop as it is in the middle of the oldest park in Helsinki. It also offers a place for a lunch or coffee if you forgot to take lunch with you. Depending how much time you have, you can continue towards Vantaa, even Kerava along the river side, but the bridges across the river make it easy to decide to change direction.

Overall, the route along the river is a nice ride, with bike you can explore more during the day. As the path goes along the riverside, it is mostly an easy ride, too. Map or GPS is a nice companion if you are not familiar with the neighbourhood, as the route does take you every now and then off the riverside.
How to get there:

Take a tram to the final stop of 6 or 8 to Arabianranta, and start the walk along the seaside of Arabianranta. Buses 68 and 71 take you directly to the rapid, in the end of Hämeentie. Local trains to Oulunkylä take you directly close to Pikkukoski. There are also several buses directly to Tuomarinkylän kartano direction.

Text: Siru Nori
Photos: Antti Huttunen

Nuuksio National Park Is a Spectacular Wilderness Area Right next to Helsinki

Nuuksio lake highland is very close to Helsinki, but its atmosphere is really far from the hustle and bustle of the city. Nuuksio is in many ways one of Finland’s most important nature sites. It is easy to get there by bus and there are plenty of fire places and marked trails in the area. In the forests and gorges of Nuuksio you cant get enough of nature. People have been in Nuuksio for thousands of years as the ancient rock paintings, like the one shaped like an elk by the lake Pitkäjärvi, let us understand.

A successful day trip starts casually from the door of a cabin, and after the memorable day in the nature the next best thing is to have a comfy bed and catch up with the fellow hikers. Check out Nuuksio’s cozy cottage options, where you can comfortably have a bigger party. Book your preferred cottage in advance online so you can focus on relaxing and enjoying the the wilder side of the Helsinki area.

Click here to find and book a cottage in Nuuksio

It is easy to get to Nuuksio by public transport

Different parts of Nuuksio national park are easy to reach from Helsinki. First, take a train S, U, L or E to get to Espoo.

  • If you want to visit the eastern or northern parts of Nuuksio national park, take the bus 245(A) from Espoo Centre. In the winter, the bus will take you to a place called Nuuksionpää. In the summer you’ll get a bit further, to Kattila. Both of these places are located in the national park area and are good places to start your hike in Nuuksio. This bus will also take you to the Finnish Nature Centre Haltia.
  • If you wish to see the southern part of Nuuksio, first take a train from Helsinki to Leppävaara in Espoo. Then take the bus 238 from Leppävaara to Siikaranta or Siikaniemi in Nuuksio.
  • To get to the western side of Nuuksio you can simply take a coach from Kamppi bus station in Helsinki. This coach will take you to Tervalampi, from where you need to walk about 2 kilometers to get to the national park. Find your bus here.

Nature Center Haltia is ready to guide you to the secrets of nature

In addition to Nuuksio, the Nature Center introduces you to the gems of Finnish nature. The building itself is a piece of architecture and definately worth of seeing and experiencing. Children are given a change to try how it feels to crowl into a fox’s or bear’s nest. There is also an unobstructed hiking trail next to Haltia where nature experiences are all accessible.

Haltia has a constantly something new to experience. For more information, visit the Visitor Center’s web site.

Trails in Nuuksio:

  • Nahkiaispolku, 2km: Natural restoration theme trail starting from the nature hut
  • Punarinnankierros, 2km: Easy trail that fits for the beginners starts from the nature hut of Haukkalampi.
  • Kaarniaispolku, 2,7km: Especially a versatile nature trails for school children starts from the end of road soidentaantie.
  • Haukankierros, 4km: trail with contrasting terrain leads to mighty sceneries. Starting from the nature hut of Haukkalampi.
  • Klassarinkierros, 4km: Circle trail by the surroundings of the bond Saarilampi starts from the road Valklammintie.
  • Korpin kierros, 8km: Great trail for the first time visitors in Nuuksio starts from the nature hut of Haukkalampi

Read more about Nuuksio in English here.

Photos by Antti Huttunen and Nella Himari.

Some summer moments

So as some of you might know, I absolutely love being near Finnish lakes. I ended up spending a lot of time this summer in the Finnish nature, particularly in Joensuu. Since I live close to the nature there, it’s really easy to just get on my bike and cycle to the lake or forest.

I also started making some videos this summer about exploring Finnish nature and practicing my photography (you can find them on www.jasontiilikainen.com). Anyways, here are some of the photos that I took this summer.

Pictured above is a small, lonely island soaking in the last bit of sunlight for the day. I went exploring on a few different islands this summer, and this lovely scene really caught my attention.

​Above​ is a shot that I took after rushing around on a lake by boat, trying to find the perfect place before the sunset. I managed to find this really nice place. I then waited for sunset and took the shot.​

In the picture above, I was exploring the shore of a lake in Joensuu. I found this nice little piece of driftwood just sitting around. I moved it slightly so that it would compliment the composition that I wanted, and then I took the shot just after the sun went down behind the horizon.

Above is a photo that I took in the forest. It was still about an hour or two before sunset, so I got some lovely sunlight coming into the forest from behind the trees. I love how green it gets here in Finland. Everything always looks so fresh and alive. The forest also has a really nice relaxing smell to it.

This sky in the above picture was amazing to behold. Being there and seeing this dreamy pink/purple colour in the clouds just felt completely out of this world. It was also really windy, and the clouds were moving really fast, giving it even more of a dramatic effect. Moments like these don’t happen every day in Finland, but when they do, they are amazing to witness.

Sometimes its difficult to concentrate on taking photos when you have mesmerising moments like this one shown in the picture above. The weather was at first incredibly cloudy, almost overcast, but after a while the clouds started to break apart. After breaking apart, I was left with a sky that truly amazed me. The formations and shapes in the clouds really complimented the simplicity of the foreground.

Pictured above is me standing on a rock at the end of the day. I had just finished doing my photography, and thought I’d take this picture just for fun.

I hope everyone has a great autumn! I’m sure the colours will be amazing as usual, and that there will be tons of amazing photographs to look at. Bye for now!

Enter The Land Of Melancholic Beauty

Perhaps not as striking and immediate as the Alps, nor as intimidating as the gorges of Norway, Finland can definitely be a strange beast to fathom, but there is great beauty here, beauty that is not found anywhere else on the planet.

In fact, besides those famous Lapland photos of aurora borealis and snow bent pines, small cottages and midsummer nights, it might appear to you that Finland is nothing but an endless stretch of mottled blues and greens. And while it’s true, it’s also so much more: It’s all about the details, and less about the scale. It is the silence, the sudden rush of leaves, the seasonal shift, the whole enthralling ambiance of the north.

A moment of stillness just before the sun takes the plunge.

While other countries often give me this continuous feeling of awe, bombarding my senses with towering mountains, quaint seaside vistas or gently rolling hills, nothing can really beat the magic of the moment I’ve felt herein. It’s a feeling hard to describe, with seemingly melancholy surroundings of little remark. It’s one of those deeply personal experiences everyone must figure out for themselves.

“Surely we have leagues upon leagues of lonely woods and scores of glimmering rural lakes, but to truly feel the magic – you only need to pick out any neck of the woods and let yourself be spellbound.”

Now, you might say that I’m perhaps a little bit biased, that everyone thinks just so about their country, but bear with me here. Although I have a great sense of home, my true country is nature, unhindered and unconfined by any border.

Imagine yourself somewhere there by the rocky coast, under those shadowy trees, enjoying the purity and silence.

For me the most memorable moments are those of discovery after a long day’s hike when you find that perfect spot in the wilderness. Be it in a dark wood by the deep green stream, or a solitary free-for-all cabin in the midst of winter. The peace that follows. The campfire by which you might find yourself contemplating the simple fact of being alive, or just warm yourself with the kuksa full of coffee.

Wilderness huts such as this one are scattered all around Finland for anyone to use as a temporary shelter.

Come summer and those mornings when you wake up to a concerto of early birds and the misty light of dawn. There is something ancient and shamanistic about it really, some deeper unconscious connection between the man and the wild, so often lost in this time and age.

What do you think? Why not come and explore it for yourself. The arboreal land of bear, elk and deer welcomes you!

Reindeers, while keeping their distance, are often quite curious about the wandering folk.

A stormfront chasing across the marsh with thunder in its wake.

Finland is all about stark contrasts and attraction of the opposites.

Amidst all those browns and greens, it’s spectacular to see a heather in bloom against the morning rise.

My Finland

I have been living here in Finland for close to 7 years now, after coming to Finland in 2011 in search of new adventures. I fell in love with the arctic and a local Finnish woman and have never left. While Enontekiö and Kilpisjärvi are my home and base for my guiding business, I have been lucky enough to live and visit a large number of places throughout Finland. Below is a summary of my Finland, in 5 photos. Enjoy!

These are the fells of Pallas-Yllästunturi National Park in the middle of autumn. This was taken the old fashioned way, out the window of a 2 seater aeroplane, piloted by my wife’s Uncle. The park has everything Lapland has to offer in one location, open fell tops, forests, marshes and lakes. As one of the national parks certified guides it was great to be able to see one of my workplaces from the air.

Kilpisjärvi, located in the arm of Finland, on the border of Sweden and Norway, is my home. There is nowhere else in Finland which offers the same mountainous landscapes. It’s a fantastic place for viewing the northern lights, and in winter you can ski or snowshoe pretty much anywhere you like. This shot is taken under Saana Fell looking over Lake Kilpisjärvi towards the Norwegian mountains.

At the other end of the country is Teijo National Park. It’s only a couple of hours from Helsinki, close to Turku and has around 80km of hiking trails. I was sleeping in of the laavu’s (a lean-to-shelter) in the park and was woken by the sun at around 4:30am to find myself shrouded in mist. This was one of the last photos I shot before the mist cleared. Misty mornings are common in Finland, particularly in autumn as the temperatures start to cool.

For me, this shot is winter. It’s one of the reasons I never went back to NZ. The temperature at the time was -42 C, the air was crisp and froze on the back of my camera every time I took a breath. When I looked through the viewfinder, my nose would freeze to the screen. Both our cars wouldn’t start and while most people stayed indoors, I was out exploring on snowshoes for a good couple of hours. I may not have been born in the north but I often feel as if I was meant to be.

I also love forests, which is a good thing as Finland is a land of forests, with seventy five percent of the country covered by them.  In the middle of summer, when everything is lush and green, that’s when they are at their best. This image was shot at Koli National Park back in 2015. The views from the top of the of the park are amazing, but it was the lushness of the forest which stood out for me.