On the ice of Päijänne National Park

We wanted to spend a night outside and took some time to figure out where to go. We got an idea to walk on the ice and find a small isle to spend a night. We would have a great view around us from there. Päijänne is a large and long lake, where there are lots of small and a bit bigger isles. During the winter, some people ice skate or ski on the ice of Päijänne all the way from Lahti to Jyväskylä (136km) in one or two days.

Screen shot: retkikartta.fi

We soon got some ideas about where we would be heading to. Also, we figured we should use pulks (small toboggans) for getting our gear to place X easier. Some of us had skis or skates but not everyone, so we decided to walk there, with spikes on our shoes.

I bought spikes and a simple cheap pulk, which i modified a bit. I have Osprey Transporter 60L bag, and for the cover I used my bigger backpack rain cover. Found some hooks and shock cord, all done in 30 mins.

Woke up at 7am and packed all that was left. Got my small Savotta MiniJäger backpack, there I packed all the food etc. 9.30am I was on the road, heading to Tuulos, where I’d leave my car. My friend Jani picked me up around 12. Coffee break at the local mall, then we had a one hour drive to Höysniemi parking. My car isn’t in great shape, for example my exhaust pipe is broken, so most likely it would have been  ripped off on the forest roads….

Before 2pm we were there, Joonas arrived about an hour later and found us from Pitkäniemi.

The weather was perfect! We all got our sunglasses, snow blindness avoided! There was some snow on the top of the ice, but it was easy to walk. Some 10-15cm piles sometimes, and we (or I) got a bit scared every time we heard a cracking sound… The weather had been really warm and a bit rainy too, so the slush was frozen a bit and broke when we’d step on it. But the ice was about 25 to 35cm thick. No wind, even though the forecast had told us about 5-6m/s winds.

It was amazing to see so far and walk there, where we last summer were in a boat! Walking on the snow covered ice, which had no marks of other people. It was a snow desert. Colors of Finnish flag, blue sky and white snow.

Our pulks worked really well, I was happy. Also the spikes were really necessary.

Soon after we arrived to Pitkäniemi, we found out that the forest on our right side had blocked the wind. But it didn’t bother us, since the Pitkäniemi lean-to was a bit deeper in the forest and the trees gave us a good cover.

Wind drawed great piles and drawings into the snow. Light frosty snow danced and flew around us. It was so beautiful….!

We were not sure if we are going to stay there. We had asked about the current firewood situation via Päijänne National Park Facebook site, and they told us that Kelvenne has none. Unfortunately, Pitkäniemi had none either…. Only some sticks etc that someone had been carrying from the forest.

however, after some discussion, we decided to stay there. Jani disappeared to get some firewood from the car. A bit later he called for help, because he had taken one dry and long log with him. So I walked to help him and pulled the pulk full of wood.

The Sun was going down fast, so we went to enjoy the golden moment… Beautiful! Wind was blowing light snow, and the colors were amazing… It might have been cold, but my heart and mind felt really warm.

Blue tones got more deeper when the Sun went behind the horizon….

It was time to prepare the dinner, everybody was really hungry. Bacon, potatos, vegetables… I got a couple of good steaks and made some smashed potatoes. It was a good eatin’!

A couple came to greet us, and decided to sleep in the lean-to. They had fatbikes and they were cycling around Päijänne. They ate something too and went for drive again for awhile. It was fun to see their lights moving far away.

It was time to enjoy the starry sky. We did see a lot of them… Big dipper, Orion and it’s belt etc… They were bright. Also the milky way was above us, we could see it barely. I need to buy a DSLR camera again! This time I only got my LG G4 phone and Fuji X20 camera with me.

So we got some ideas and played with some long exposures, light painting etc. They came out pretty good!

We had fun on the ice and at the lean-to. Good stories and jokes, great food and so on. It was a bit cold but the wind was dying slowly, so the small breeze here didn’t bother us anymore.

It was time to go to sleep. I had my 4x4m DD tarp with me, so I had lot’s of room. This time I had chosen the Ticket hammock: it fit’s well with my Cumulus Selva 600 underquilt. Took some time to get all warm, felt a bit chilly on my back at first, but slowly everything was warming up. Snug as a bug. Warm and toasty inside of Savotta Military bag. Temp went down to -10’C.

Woke up 7.30am, and it was still dark. Wait, I need to get out from the bag where I was totally buried… Oh wow, it’s a beautiful morning! The tarp was a bit frosty inside, but everything was dry.

Niko opened my tarp so I could see the view. I didn’t want to get out from the warm bag….

We all had had a warm night and we all had slept well. The wind was gone, but so was the morning sun.

Only big cloudy sky was saying goodbye when we headed back to our cars. It started to snow also. We had a coffee break at the Tuulos mall and said goodbye until next time.

It was an awesome trip and thank you all! Not sure if we can enjoy these kind of weathers this winter again. Spring is coming slowly, so other adventures calling.

More photos from Päijänne : pixabilly.1g.fi

Here is a video from our trip too :

Thank you for reading!

Snowshoeing in Puijo forest in winter. Photo: Upe Nykänen

Snowshoeing in the city at Kuopio? The answer is Puijo!

Sometimes you get lucky and can find just the thing you are looking for very close to you. We chose Kuopio as our destination for a winter weekend mostly because it offers plenty of great winter activities within a very short distance from the heart of the city.

Puijo Tower at Kuopio. Photo: Upe Nykänen

The city’s famous landmark Puijo ridge with its iconic Puijo Tower is less than 3 kilometres from the city centre. However, Puijo is also a haven for nature lovers: it is among the oldest nature conservation areas in Finland, having been established on Puijo ridge already in 1928.

We had already had a great time kicksledding on Lake Kallavesi, straight from Kuopio’s passenger harbour. Next, we headed up to the Puijo hill for a bit of snowshoeing.

Trail signs at Puijo, Kuopio in winter. Photo: Upe Nykänen

We parked our car at the car park closest to Konttila Farm and grabbed our snowshoes. The map of Puijo paths indicated clearly marked paths and when we arrived at the signposts, we saw to our surprise that we would have been fine even without snowshoes: the paths were well trodden.

Puijo forest in winter. Photo: Upe Nykänen

However, very soon we abandoned the marked trail and set off to find our own way in the gorgeous, snowy forest wearing our snowshoes. The great thing about leaving your own footprints in the snow is that you can’t get lost – you can always see where you came from and retrace your steps, if necessary.

Snowshoeing in Puijo forest in winter. Photo: Upe Nykänen

The fir trees of Puijo have enjoyed peace and quiet for decades, thanks to its status as a nature conservation area. We started heading towards Satulanotko.

Snowshoeing at Puijo, Kuopio. Photo: Upe Nykänen

Every once in a while we stopped to gaze the trees above. Suddenly we saw something colourful behind the tree trunks: a trail runner following the path closest to us. We preferred a slower pace.

Fallen fir tree at Puijo conservation area, Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

There is absolutely no logging at Puijo conservation area. However, sometimes trees happen to fall down naturally, just like this poor fir tree fellow.

Snowy fir trees at Puijo conservation area, Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

Suddenly we heard a strange, creaking sound pretty close to us. It took us a while to locate its source: a fallen tree had got stuck, leaning against another tree, and whenever the fir tree swayed even a bit in the wind, the contact made it sound like a creaking door.

Other than that, it was almost totally quiet. Although we were so close to Kuopio city and the distance to the closest roads isn’t great, we could hardly hear any cars through the dense forest.

When you are snowshoeing, you don’t usually need to worry about getting cold. However, when the temperature is about -18 °C, you soon get a craving for a hot drink. We turned our faces towards the beautiful winter sun and began walking back, towards Konttila Farm.

Konttila Farm, Puijo, Kuopio. Photo: Upe Nykänen

You just can’t miss Konttila Farm – it dates back to 1770 and when you enter it, it feels like you are stepping back in time. The farm is open all year round and welcomes visitors to its café and nature & guiding centre. Konttila Farm is open most days until 6 pm.

Cafe at Konttila Farm, Puijo, Kuopio. Photo: Upe Nykänen

We left our snowshoes outside and stepped into the main building. Hot chocolate? Yes, please! We began sipping our delicious cups of hot chocolate and just enjoyed the moment, listening to the fire start roaring in the traditional old fireplace.

I wonder when I will dare to try the cross-country skiing tracks at Puijo…

Konttila Farm on the map

Read next:

On a one horse open sleigh at Puijo, Kuopio

Sleighride at Konttila farm in winter, Puijo, Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

On a one-horse open sleigh at Puijo, Kuopio

Prancing through the snow, on a one-horse open sleigh? Come on, it’s not Xmas… Little did we expect that our day trip to Puijo hill on an ordinary winter day in February would include a sleighride!

Our main reason for visiting Konttila farm on top of Puijo ridge, only few kilometres from the city centre of Kuopio, was that there is a small café which serves also hot drinks along with a selection of sweet and savoury snacks. A mug of hot chocolate never goes amiss on a cold day like this: -18 °C.

Konttila farm in winter, Puijo, Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

The main building at Konttila dates back to 1770 and is among the oldest in Kuopio city. These days, the farm welcomes visitors on a daily basis all year round to learn about the surrounding nature as well as to its café that is located in the main building (just try the door handle). The farm is usually open until 6 p.m.

We were just about to leave the warmth of Konttila when our host asked if we’d be interested in a sleigh ride? Yes please!

Finnhorse Miilu at Konttila, Puijo, Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

 

Who would be doing the hard work? The 27 year old gelding Miilu (a Finnhorse) whose grandad Vieteri was a Finnish harness racing champion, just like Miilu’s uncle, an equally famous Viesker.

We walked to the end of the shed, sat down on the open sleigh and our host drew a warm blanket over our legs before we set off.

Sleighride at Konttila farm in winter, Puijo, Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

Miilu turned towards the track and we moved swiftly on top of the crisp white snow, with the lovely winter sun shining above us from the perfectly clear blue sky.

You just can’t compare this to a snowmobile ride.

Konttila farm in winter, Puijo, Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

The track took us round the open space, right next to the lovely, snowy forest, and at intervals, our host stopped Miilu so that we could take photos.

Sleighride at Konttila farm in winter, Puijo, Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

When we were getting closer to the main building of Konttila farm, we thought the ride was almost over, but now: our host led Miilu towards the small road. Finally, thought Miilu, and our sleigh picked up speed when he started trotting happily.

The lovely 15-minute sleighride really made the Puijo visit special.

Puijo tower at Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

However, our trip to Puijo wasn’t yet over. To finalize our great day on top of Puijo ridge we walked the few hundred meters from Konttila farm to Puijo Tower which isn’t just an observation tower but also has a nice restaurant/café.

View from Puijo tower at Kuopio, Finland. Photo: Upe Nykänen

Below our feet were the ski jumping tower, the downhill skiing slopes, and the forests of Puijo nature conservation area. Puijo Tower is well worth a visit as from there you can get a lovely view all over Kuopio and its surroundings, maybe even spot the location of Konttila Farm.

Thanks again to Miilu, we’ll definitely be back at Puijo!

Konttila Farm, Puijo, Kuopio, Finland on the map

I can not imagine a better way to spend an afternoon in Lapland – a trip to the top of Oratunturi fell

One of the best times to enjoy the beauty of Lapland is March. There’s still lots of snow and even auroras, but also plenty of sunlight.

I took these pictures on an ordinary Monday afternoon just days ago, when me and my husband went to the top of Oratunturi fell to see the sunset.

A snowmobile trail leads to the top of the fell. The more up you go, the snowier the trees get.

Snowmobiling is an every(winter)day hobby for many laplanders. I, however, am still practicing. This time I felt lazy, so I let my husband do the driving. I just sat behind him holding on to him like a koala, relaxing and enjoying the beautiful snowy views.

The snowmobile trail leads to a lean-to that anyone is free to use. From here, the summit of the fell is no longer far away.

The view from the top is magnificent. We were amazed that the air was perfectly still! Usually it’s super windy on top of any fell.

I recognized many other fells in the horizon, for example Pyhä and Luosto, the two famous fells of Pyhä-Luosto national park.

Luosto

Pyhä (far away in the middle, with ski slopes and a mast on top)

Me. Photo: Joel Saari

It had been windy at some point. Cold, moist wind makes these little “leaves” of ice (below).

I can not imagine a better way to spend an afternoon in Lapland. I hope you too can experience something like this one day!

Oratunturi on GoogleMaps.

Beautiful white & blue views from the top of Kommatti hill – this is Finnish winter at its best!

The polar night felt endless this year. So now that the sun is back, I need to get out and enjoy some bright sunlight!

Near my home there’s a hill called Kommattivaara (map link). It’s easy to reach by car, so it’s a great destination for a little winter trip.

It was quite chilly when we visited Kommatti about a week ago. Maybe -20 degrees Celcius. I loved it. Lots of snow, lots of sunshine and lots of tranquility. And no mosquitos!

Kommatti is not a huge tourist attraction. Here you can actually hear and feel the peace and nature of true Lapland.

We didn’t go to the ski slope because that would be dangerous. Fast skiers and slow snowshoers are not a good combination. So we chose a quiet path in the forest next to the ski slope.

Kommatti is right next to Sodankylä village in the middle of Lapland. There is a small skiing center downhill, where you can rent some gear and grab a cup of coffee before heading uphill to these magnificent views.

Even though the hike to the top is not very long – less than a kilometer – make sure you have proper winter clothes, a map and enough drinking water with you. Also, as the snow is very deep, snowshoes come in very handy. Without snowshoes you’ll soon be swimming in snow, and it’s practically impossible to get forward if you leave the trail.

Lots of snow and sunshine! This is Finnish winter at its best.

The Lakes Are Calling

Over the last few months I’ve been fairly busy with things other than photography, but never too busy for an occasional trip to the water. The Finnish lakes have once again been calling my name and spoiling me with moments of tranquility and a feeling that makes me appreciate life in the greater sense.

I always feel as though something is pulling me into the forest or towards a lake and that I have very little control over it (help?). So in connection with what seems to be a loss of free will to some degree, I have managed to get a few photos over the last few months. Below are some more scenes that Finnish nature has been so kind to bless me with.

Above: A sunset over lake Pyhäselkä in Joensuu, Finland. The weather was windy and clouds were moving through the sky fairly quickly.

Above:​ An ice fisherman leaves the frozen lake after a fishing session. This photo was taken after some heavy snowfall that left all rocks on the shore completely covered.

Above: A splash of sunlight to end the day off spectacularly.

Above: Trails of snow leave interesting formations over the lake.

Above: A maze of snow coating the icy lake surface. This was the first time that I had seen these types of interesting shapes.

Above: Another very long exposure shot with fast moving clouds.

Above: Another shot of the sun hovering over waves of snow. Goodbye for now, my warmest of friends.

Wishing everyone in Finland a great and fun-filled winter. Don’t forget to catch the sunsets!

www.jasontiilikainen.com | Instagram: jason_tiilikainen

Starting Vuori-Kalaja trail at Southern Konnevesi National Park

Step into the winter wonderland: a winter walk in Southern Konnevesi National Park

Sometimes you just get an urge to get out of town, to go somewhere really quiet, with only few people around you. And if it’s winter time, what could be better than to be surrounded by the whitest snow, breathe the purest air and share the moment with a friend… So let’s go and visit one of our national parks!

There are 40 national parks in Finland; five of them are located in the province of Central Finland. To the south of Jyväskylä, there are Isojärvi National Park with its wooded hills and valleys, and Leivonmäki National Park with its easier marsh and esker terrain. The other three are north of Jyväskylä: about an hour’s drive takes you either to the old forests of Pyhä-Häkki or to the lakes and hills of Southern Konnevesi National Park, while the northernmost Salamajärvi National Park with its wild forest reindeer, pine woods and bogs adds another hour to the journey. All of these national parks are best reached with a car.

Our day trip destination was chosen based on my previous trips to Southern Konnevesi National Park: we would easily manage the trail to Vuori-Kalaja campfire shelter and back in a few hours, even with the limited daylight hours of late December. After parking our car at Törmälä we saw – to our delight – that there were already footprints on the snow-covered forest road towards the start of the Vuori-Kalaja trail.

Walking the Vuori-Kalaja trail in winter

There is no winter maintenance on the forest road so in this season be prepared to first walk 1.5 km from Törmälä to the (summer) parking area from where the Vuori-Kalaja trail begins.

I had packed two pairs of snowshoes in the car just in case, but the path trodden in the snow seemed easy enough to walk without them. We just added garters to protect our boots from snow and started following the narrow trail. The forest around us was simply magical.

Inspecting trail information at Vuori-Kalaja

After inspecting the trail information at Kalaja parking area we stepped onto the Vuori-Kalaja trail. From this spot it is only 900 meters’ walk to Vuori-Kalaja lean-to and campfire site.

Winter wonderland: snowy forest

That’s when we really felt like stepping into the winter wonderland! The snow covered birches, alders and firs all around us were simply amazing. Nature’s own sculptures!

Vuori-Kalaja lean-to in winter

Once we’d arrived at Vuori-Kalaja campfire shelter our first task was to make a fire and luckily, there was plenty of dry firewood available. Oh, where are my matches? There!

Campfire at Vuori-Kalaja shelter

A campfire is always a treat, but especially on a winter trip.

After the fire was happily burning, I stepped to the shore of the frozen lake and admired the snowy view: Kalajanvuori (Kalaja hill).

Kalajanvuori hill, Vuori-Kalaja

The snowy, steep cliffs on the opposite shore of lake Vuori-Kalaja were impressive in their almost black and white glory. There is something special about a winter landscape that lacks all the vivid colors of the other seasons: a certain serenity. Everything stands still, all is calm.

As the winter had until now been fairly mild, I knew that it wouldn’t be safe to step on the ice and walk across the lake to the cliffs (the ice just wasn’t solid enough yet) so it was better to stay on land rather than risk it. Time to take out the thermos flasks, sandwiches, and did someone mention a slice of cake?

Coffee break at Vuori-Kalaja shelter

We were already sipping our cups of tea and coffee and digging into the cake when we heard voices from behind the shelter.

Three young men with big backpacks arrived and sat down for a bit of rest before heading back to their car. The brave trio had spent a night sleeping outdoors at another campfire site in the national park. Wow! Yes, you can go hiking in the woods also in wintertime if you’ve got the right gear – but for some of us, just a day trip is quite enough…

Walking in the winter wonderland at Southern Konnevesi National Park

However, soon it was time to head back to the car and return to city lights, and enjoy the last minutes of winter magic in daylight before the drive home.

Hiker at Southern Konnevesi National Park, Central Finland. Photo:Upe Nykanen

The dusk was already beginning to fall when we met the next winter walker, a young hiker with impressive looking gear, carrying also a pair of snowshoes. Just in case – to allow him to walk where there was no trail! The serious hikers were going to the woods while we city girls were leaving…

I wonder if we should try winter camping next time?

Directions: how to get to Southern Konnevesi National Park

Map to Törmälä parking area | ETRS-TM35FIN -coordinates  N=6941195.000, E=485582.000
Google Maps: Konnekoskentie 552, Rautalampi

Map, lean-to shelter at Vuori-Kalaja

This article has been previously published at visitcentralfinland.com.

Make friends with a reindeer – it’s easier than you think, as long as you’ve got some treats

In Northern Finland there are several reindeer parks where one can meet and feed some super cute domesticated reindeer.

One of these parks, a reindeer park called Kopara, is situated in Luosto area in the middle of Lapland. One day I went there with my husband and his daughter.

I must confess, I’m crazy about reindeer. I was much more excited about meeting these animals than the six-year-old was. She is born and raised in Lapland, so to her reindeer are not that exotic. I, however, come from Southern Finland, where there are no reindeer whatsoever.

In Lapland you can see reindeer herds roaming free practically anywhere. Those animals are quite shy: they are only semi-domestic. There are over 200 000 reindeer in Finland and each one of them has an owner. Somewhere.

In reindeer parks the animals are much braver: they are used to getting some treats from reindeer-loving tourists. That’s why they actually come running towards you to see if you have something yummy to give them.

In Kopara there is this big chest full of reindeer food in front of the fence. After having paid just a few euros you get to go there and feed the reindeer. Just take some food and hand it over to them. They won’t bite.

Reindeer don’t really enjoy being pet. They withdraw as soon as you run out of food pellets. Luckily, you can always give them some more treats from the chest. We spent about 15 minutes feeding these reindeer, before we got too cold (remember to wear some really warm clothes!)

In Kopara there is also a café and a souvenir boutique. They also offer a variety of reindeer experiences and they actually have a few celebrity reindeer as well. Read more here: Kopara homepage

This place is right next to Pyhä-Luosto National Park.

Learn more about Finnish reindeer here.

The polar night is not pitch black, it’s magically blue! See what Kaamos actually looks like

While walking my son to school yesterday morning we noticed a peculiar phenomenon – the Sun was rising!

Living in Finland teaches us from the birth that winters are long. Not because of the cold and snow but because of the long darkness.

Kaamos is a Finnish word for polar night. It’s a beautiful word and we do not have that many of those to begin with.

But what is it?

Faint glimmers of light paint landscapes to vistas of beauty. (Liesjärvi National Park, Southern Finland, January)

Kaamos or polar night occurs when the night lasts more than 24 hours. In southern parts of Finland where I currently live even the darkest day still has few hours of light in. But most of the time dark clouds veil the sky.

While living in Rovaniemi (that’s at the edge of Arctic Circle) the days were even shorter. And as a student spending the “days” at the University of Lapland I went days without seeing any kind of daylight.

December, photo taken around noon, Olos fell, Muonio, Lapland (Northern Finland)

Above the Arctic Circle the long night gets even longer. In Utsjoki (the northernmost municipality of Finland) kaamos lasts a little over fifty days. Imagine living in a place where it takes over a month to see any ray of light.

Samoyed dogs looking at river Teno in Utsjoki. This is what noon looks like in the northernmost parts of Finland during polar night.

It would seem that Kaamos is the source of stereotypical Finnish melancholy. It might very well be at least a part of that but it is also the source of much that is beautiful. You might have heard the saying that “it’s magical”. That is quite likely the most accurate impression anyone can give.

In Lapland kaamos mostly looks blue. Christmas eve (noon) in Sodankylä, Lapland, Northern Finland.

Polar night is a phenomenon that is hard to grasp in the current age of electric light and busy city schedules. It might sound banal but it is something that must be experienced.

Sun rising for the first time after polar night in Kittilä, Lapland.

At first it does not seem like that big of a deal. The night goes on and on. But the more you think of it, the more you feel of it, the more you begin to understand the grandness of it. It makes you feel small. And it makes you understand the vast scale of space and how multitudinous the Earth is.

The beauty of Kaamos can be found everywhere if you are willing to look. (Kangasala, Southern Finland, January)

And in that long night, in the wilds of Finland, it is most likely that you will witness the magnificent Northern Lights. In Finnish they are called Revontulet – a word that can be loosely translated to “Fox’s blaze”. And there are a lot of stories about what they are. But we’ll leave that to another time.

Auroras above a reindeer fence in Utsjoki during polar night.

So if you have heart for celestial phenomenon like Solar Eclipses I would recommend you to visit Finland during Kaamos. It will be an unforgettable experience!

There is a Game of Thrones themed hotel, and it is made of ice and snow and a little bit of magic – You must see these pictures!

In Lainio village of Kittilä, there is a snow village and a hotel, which rebuilt every year in November, when winter has came. This year, they worked together with the HBO Nordic and result is out of this world.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

Winter is here. There’s no doubt. They created a stunning Game of Thrones-themed hotel, which is built entirely of snow and ice. The hotel is decorated with snow and ice sculptures inspired by tv-series.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

There are icy Iron Throne, and a Mountain watching (I hope your relationship with the Cercei is ok).

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

A bar with dragon sculptures to have drinks of fire and ice.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

A snowy Westeros map on the wall.

About  20 million kilograms of snow and 350 000 kilograms of natural ice are used to build this spectacular place.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

Of course there is the Dragon slide, wanna try?

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

Guests can enter the Hall of Faces.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

How about a wedding night in White Walker suite? Don’t forget the dragonglass!

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

Sculptures were made by nine best professional icesculptor from all over the world: from Russia, Ukraine and Poland, then had to Latvia.

Wanna have a room? Book here.

Wanna visit?

Snow Village is open for visitors daily 10-22. Last entrance is 21:00.

Address

Lapland Hotels Snow Village
Lainiotie 566
99120 Kittilä

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