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10 photos that make you want to visit Lapland in autumn

Many people travel to Lapland in wintertime. However, autumn in Lapland is absolutely magical as well. Check out these 10 photos to find out, why You should visit Lapland in Septemper, October or November!

1. Auroras

First auroras can often be seen in September or even in August. Unlike in winter, it’s still quite warm compared to winter temperatures, so one can admire this beautiful phenomenon without getting too cold.

2. Autumn foliage

The most beautiful colors are usually seen in September.

3. Clean air

In autumn the air seems to be full of oxygen. It is cleaner than you could ever imagine – just take a breath and you’ll notice it instantly.

4. Clear waters

In winter everything is frozen, but in autumn you can still enjoy watching and listening the rivers rumbling. Maybe you’ll even find a spring and taste how cold and pure the water is?

5. Local wild food

Big fish, tasty mushrooms and berries full of vitamins – Lapland has it all. Did you know that thanks to Finnish everyman’s rights, you can pick mushrooms and berries in the nature without asking for permissions?

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6. First frosty mornings

These are one of the best moments of the year! Now you can really see and feel the first steps of the upcoming winter.

7. Local products

How about some Lappish honey, fish products or jewellery? You can buy some really cool things in local harvest markets.

8. Nature attractions

In Lapland there are several national parks and lots of other really cool nature destinations with well-marked trails and good campfire spots. You’ll find many of them here.

9. Reindeer

In autumn it seems like there are reindeer everywhere. Just make sure you don’t got too close, as reindeer stags can get a bit unpredictable this time of the year.

10. Enjoy the wilderness

In autumn there are not many tourists in Lapland. Wanna know what perfect silence sounds like?

Photos by Jonna Saari

I can not imagine a better way to spend an afternoon in Lapland – a trip to the top of Oratunturi fell

One of the best times to enjoy the beauty of Lapland is March. There’s still lots of snow and even auroras, but also plenty of sunlight.

I took these pictures on an ordinary Monday afternoon just days ago, when me and my husband went to the top of Oratunturi fell to see the sunset.

A snowmobile trail leads to the top of the fell. The more up you go, the snowier the trees get.

Snowmobiling is an every(winter)day hobby for many laplanders. I, however, am still practicing. This time I felt lazy, so I let my husband do the driving. I just sat behind him holding on to him like a koala, relaxing and enjoying the beautiful snowy views.

The snowmobile trail leads to a lean-to that anyone is free to use. From here, the summit of the fell is no longer far away.

The view from the top is magnificent. We were amazed that the air was perfectly still! Usually it’s super windy on top of any fell.

I recognized many other fells in the horizon, for example Pyhä and Luosto, the two famous fells of Pyhä-Luosto national park.

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Pyhä (far away in the middle, with ski slopes and a mast on top)

Me. Photo: Joel Saari

It had been windy at some point. Cold, moist wind makes these little “leaves” of ice (below).

I can not imagine a better way to spend an afternoon in Lapland. I hope you too can experience something like this one day!

Oratunturi on GoogleMaps.

Beautiful white & blue views from the top of Kommatti hill – this is Finnish winter at its best!

The polar night felt endless this year. So now that the sun is back, I need to get out and enjoy some bright sunlight!

Near my home there’s a hill called Kommattivaara (map link). It’s easy to reach by car, so it’s a great destination for a little winter trip.

It was quite chilly when we visited Kommatti about a week ago. Maybe -20 degrees Celcius. I loved it. Lots of snow, lots of sunshine and lots of tranquility. And no mosquitos!

Kommatti is not a huge tourist attraction. Here you can actually hear and feel the peace and nature of true Lapland.

We didn’t go to the ski slope because that would be dangerous. Fast skiers and slow snowshoers are not a good combination. So we chose a quiet path in the forest next to the ski slope.

Kommatti is right next to Sodankylä village in the middle of Lapland. There is a small skiing center downhill, where you can rent some gear and grab a cup of coffee before heading uphill to these magnificent views.

Even though the hike to the top is not very long – less than a kilometer – make sure you have proper winter clothes, a map and enough drinking water with you. Also, as the snow is very deep, snowshoes come in very handy. Without snowshoes you’ll soon be swimming in snow, and it’s practically impossible to get forward if you leave the trail.

Lots of snow and sunshine! This is Finnish winter at its best.

Make friends with a reindeer – it’s easier than you think, as long as you’ve got some treats

In Northern Finland there are several reindeer parks where one can meet and feed some super cute domesticated reindeer.

One of these parks, a reindeer park called Kopara, is situated in Luosto area in the middle of Lapland. One day I went there with my husband and his daughter.

I must confess, I’m crazy about reindeer. I was much more excited about meeting these animals than the six-year-old was. She is born and raised in Lapland, so to her reindeer are not that exotic. I, however, come from Southern Finland, where there are no reindeer whatsoever.

In Lapland you can see reindeer herds roaming free practically anywhere. Those animals are quite shy: they are only semi-domestic. There are over 200 000 reindeer in Finland and each one of them has an owner. Somewhere.

In reindeer parks the animals are much braver: they are used to getting some treats from reindeer-loving tourists. That’s why they actually come running towards you to see if you have something yummy to give them.

In Kopara there is this big chest full of reindeer food in front of the fence. After having paid just a few euros you get to go there and feed the reindeer. Just take some food and hand it over to them. They won’t bite.

Reindeer don’t really enjoy being pet. They withdraw as soon as you run out of food pellets. Luckily, you can always give them some more treats from the chest. We spent about 15 minutes feeding these reindeer, before we got too cold (remember to wear some really warm clothes!)

In Kopara there is also a café and a souvenir boutique. They also offer a variety of reindeer experiences and they actually have a few celebrity reindeer as well. Read more here: Kopara homepage

This place is right next to Pyhä-Luosto National Park.

Learn more about Finnish reindeer here.

This is what I saw as I walked 500 meters into a dark, silent, frozen forest

I live in a small village in the middle of Lapland. In fact, most people who live in Lapland live in small villages. That’s because there are almost no proper cities here at all, above the arctic circle.

And because there are no cities, there is no articifial light, but lots and lots of darkness in winter. But during this darkness, the sky can sometimes set on green and purple fire.

Last night I left home around 7 p.m. and walked into the forest next to our house. I had no headlamp or flashlight with me, as I knew that after a few minutes my eyes would get used to the darkness. There is a bit of snow on the ground, which helps to see the path. Also, the Moon started rising.

After having walked only about a 100 meters, I saw the first flames in the sky.

I sat down and looked at the auroras dancing above me.

In the dark forest full of pure silence, I could hear some soft and distant rustling. At first I thought it was the aurora making that noise, as they are known to make some weird sounds sometimes. But then, as I sat there thinking about it, I realized that what I actually heard was the nearby lake freezing. The temperature was well below zero.

I stood up and headed forward. I wanted to see the nearest swamp. And boy, was it beautiful.

I sat down again, this time next to a small pine on the edge of the forest. I didn’t want to walk on the swamp, as it might not be fully frozen yet. It was safer to stay on dry ground. I was wearing enough clothes so I didn’t feel cold at all, even though I was sitting in snow.

I could still hear the sound of the freezing lake. Then I heard a little snap behind me. I still don’t know what it was, but probably it was just a freezing tree. Trees can make popping sounds when it gets really cold. It’s such an interesting experience to walk into a dark forest in winter: you can even hear the trees.

I texted my husband that everything was ok and that I was be heading home now.

In a Finnish forest there’s really not much to be afraid of. Reindeer and moose are not dangerous, and wolves, wolverines and bears do not come anywhere near you. Most finns know this and that is why we love to spend time in forests, enjoying silence, pure air and sometimes also auroras.

First snow has fallen in Lapland – this is what Sodankylä looks right now

First snow is always magical. As polar night approaches, there is less and less sunlight every day. One day the sun no longer rises at all. But with only a pinch of snow the whole world gets bright again.

I went to see the first snow to the hills of Sodankylä. My friend came along with her lapponian herder puppy Ruska.

It was a sunny day after weeks and weeks of cloudiness. We climbed to the top of Pittiövaara hill to have a picnic. A raven came to say hello to us. What a beautiful bird.

It was noon and the temperature was a few degrees below freezing. We were wearing lots of warm clothes and also proper hiking shoes – Pittiövaara is a rocky hill, and it is not easy to walk safely on big snowy rocks.

Some parts were too challenging for the puppy. Luckily she still fits in a backpack.

We chose a sunny spot to stop and have a coffee. It was a little gorge on the top of the hill, so the rocks gave us shelter from the cold wind. It was spectacular. In the horizon we could see the silhouettes of Pyhätunturi and Luosto – the Pyhä-Luosto national park.

The trip took us a few hours. I can not imagine a better way to spend a sunny Sunday in Lapland.

I’m so happy it’s snowy again. Welcome winter!

5 things you didn’t know about Lapland

What do you know about Lapland? You’ve probably heard about Santa Claus, maybe you’ve even met him when you were little. And all his reindeer of course – they live in Lapland. In winter there is lots of snow and beautiful northern lights, yes. But what more do you know?

I want to tell you about Lapland the way I know it, the way I love it. Here are 5 things you probably didn’t know about Lapland!

1. Reindeer like to hang out on roads in summer

When travelling in real Lapland it’s almost certain that you see reindeer at some point. In summer there are lots of mosquitos, so reindeer want to enjoy a bit of summer breeze that keeps the mosquitos away. That’s why they spend quite a lot of time on open places like roads. When driving, be cautious: these animals often don’t know how to give way to cars.

When you see reindeer on road, you probably want to take a photo. Make sure that you stop your car only on a good, visible spot. Do not park around a corner – there might be a bus or a truck coming behind you!

2. Summer in Lapland quite often feels like a real summer

Summers in Lapland are not very long, but they are stunningly beautiful. The sun is above the horizon 24/7 and the flowers are blooming like crazy. When the sun shines, it can get really warm, which in Lapland usually means something between 20 and 25 degrees celcius. There are lots of lakes and rivers – enjoy the Finnish everyman’s right and go for a swim!

3. Driving in Lapland is a blast

In Lapland there are endless roads and small villages in every direction. Many tourists come here by car, but if you need to take a plane to get here, I recommend you rent a car. That way you can enjoy Lapland’s traffic-free roads and amazing views on your own without having to be an expert hiker. However, remember to fill the tank often enough: it can be a 100km drive to the next gas station!

This is what you see when driving by Teno river in Utsjoki.

4. You can fish with a fishing rod almost everywhere

Thanks to everyman’s right in Finland, everyone is allowed to fish almost everywhere using a fishing rod. You don’t need any permissions, all you need is a fishing rod, some worms and a place to fish. Worms are usually sold in markets and gas stations. When choosing a place to fish, just make sure you’re not on somebody’s yard. You have an endless list of places to choose from: Lapland if full of lakes and rivers!

If fishing even with a simple fishing rod is prohibited for some reason in some specific lake or pond, there is a plaque on the spot that tells you not to fish.

5. People still offer gifts to ancient holy places

In Lapland there are many natural formations that have been concidered as holy. There are many holy fells, but also rocks, trees and ponds. A holy natural formation like this is often called a seita. They have been offered gifts like fish heads and reindeer horn bits to keep them happy, so that they would provide the giftgiver with hunting of fishing luck. Many of these places still receive gifts, like coins.

Taatsin seita in Kittilä is one of the best-known holy rock formations in Lapland.

Oulanka is one of the most magical national parks in Europe – don’t miss these 5 amazing places on your visit

This is one of the most magical national parks in Europe! This is what Daily Mail just publicly declared, and we totally agree. Oulanka National Park is known for its rapids, steep gorges, suspension bridges, and rare plants. The comprehensive and clearly marked selection of trails within the Park provides even a budding hiker with a safe way to enjoy the magnificent scenery of a real wilderness and the “almost” Siberian vibe to it. The Park is located in northern Finland, and it borders with Russia in the east.

Here are five great places you simply must not miss in Oulanka National Park!

1. The edge of the world: Oulanka Canyon

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Be careful! As you step on the edge of Oulanka Canyon, you’re in for a real surprise. You walk through a beautiful Lapland forest to discover that land literally rips up before you: the free fall down the Canyon is long, and at the bottom there is a roaring river. However, you do not have to be an action hero to get to see this startling place. The 6-kilometre-long Kanjonin kurkkaus (Oulanka Canyon Trail) is accessible and clearly marked – follow it, and you will safely get to admire the immemorial giant gorge.

2. Bridge adventure: Taivalköngäs

Do you enjoy the atmosphere of the wild and the roar of rapids? If so, then Taivalköngäs is the right place for you! Its lovely wooden suspension bridges provide you with the chance to admire and listen to the rabid turmoil of the water right from above. There is a small island in the middle of Taivasköngäs that with its tall trees and tentacle-like roots looks like a magical forest. The marked forest trail leading to Taivalköngäs is almost 10 kilometres long. Once arrived, it is possible to make a fire and stay overnight in a wilderness hut managed by Finland’s State Forest Enterprise.

3. In the heart of the wild: Ristikallio Cliff

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Standing on the edge of the imposing Ristikallio, it is easy to feel the infinite peace of the wilderness. The cliff that rises incredibly steeply from the river is like nature’s own viewing platform in the middle of the wild dominated by water, forest, and hills. No traffic noise travels up to Ristikallio, for it is a several kilometres’ walk from the nearest road. On your way you can admire
the unique forest nature of Oulanka National Park. Pay attention to even the smallest forest flowers and plants – if you look up close, you can see the delicate beauty of the north.

4. A giant waterfall: Jyrävänkoski

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The powerful buzz of Jyrävänkoski Rapid can be heard far away. The sound dominates the whole landscape. With free falls up to 9 metres, Jyrävä is one of Finland’s tallest waterfalls. A trail named Pieni Karhunkierros, with a total length of 12 kilometres, leads up to the waterfall. Along the trail you will also get to admire other graceful rapids, enjoy beautiful forests, and cross suspension bridges. Along the way, there are also a number of campfire places.

5. A strange island: Rupakivi

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A truly odd island stands out in the middle of Savinajoki River. Rupakivi is a several metres high
stone pillar, nature’s own skyscraper in the middle of the stream. A white sandy beach spreads out at the feet of the rock whose top is dotted with small growing trees. Rupakivi is the kind of place you could easily think of as the home of a fairy! A marked path leads to the rock that is best seen from the steep stairs. You cannot get close to the rock but the view is fantastic from the riverbank, as well.

+1: Remember this when you arrive in Oulanka!

The best time to visit is the time of autumn foliage when nature glows and there are less mosquitoes. Oulanka National Park has several well marked trails, and leaving them is not a good idea. Oulanka is a wilderness area where nature dictates the rules. Always prepare your hike carefully. Mobile phone coverage may not always be possible along the path. You should always carry a map with you, and please do not overestimate your physical condition – the Park’s rugged reliefs require a good level of fitness. In summer, please remember to protect yourself from mosquitoes. Valuable advice, instructions and tips for successful hikes are available at Oulanka Visitor Centre.

Here’s more information in English!

Translated by: Mikko Solja

Pink skies and freezing cold: this is what’s going on in Lapland right now

The temperature dropped in a matter of days. First it was -5 degrees celsius, then -12, then -18*. Although it has snowed next to none so far, we can say that winter has taken over the vast commune of Kittilä in western Lapland.

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The river Ounasjoki froze overnight. Everything froze. Now you can hear what total silence sounds like.

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When it’s really cold, the eastern sky turns pink during the sunset. Until of course the sun no longer rises and the polar night begins in a few weeks.

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Even during the coldest of winter days one might get some visitors.

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Can you guess who’s there, behind all that snow?

 

 

*-5 degrees Celsius is equal to 23 degrees Fahrenheit,
-12°C = 10,4°F
-18°C = -0,4°F

Finland is the 3rd best travel destination in the world – and Hossa is the jewel in its crown

Finland is the third best travel destination in the world, as published in Lonely Planet’s latest list. It’s the only country in Europe that made it to the top 10! Lonely Planet raves about Hossa in particular – a hiking area located in Eastern Finland’s mystical backwoods, which in 2017 will become a national park in celebration of Finland’s 100th year of independence.

We have listed here what we think you should really experience in Hossa.

  1. Northern Lights and stars shine in perfect darkness

Situated in Kainuu’s stunning wilderness, Hossa is far away from urban light pollution. Here you can experience complete darkness at night, and on clear evenings, marvel at the magical night sky and the even the Milky Way. It’s also possible to see the northern lights. All of this makes Hossa a fantasy destination for night sky photographers.

  1. Hossa’s natural environment is clean and quiet

Have you ever experienced perfect silence? When you can’t hear the hum of cars, people’s conversations or the rumbling of machines, even from a distance? In Hossa you’re surrounded by peaceful nature. You can immerse yourself in thought, breathe the cleanest air in the world and let your gaze rest on the picturesque scenery.  In complete silence. Sit down, make a campfire and surrender. Perfect calm and quiet creates a feeling that  you will never forget.

  1. Indulge in the fruits of the forest on your hike.

In Summer and late Summer, Kainuu’s natural surroundings are bursting with a variety of berries, all equally delicious. You  are allowed to pick berries in the woods and from the swamps as part of Everyman’s Rights. Taste the orange cloudberries, red lingonberries, blue blueberries and bog bilberries as well as crispy black crowberries. Crouch down in the forest for a short while to pick nature’s offerings, and your kuksa (traditional carved wooden cup) will be full in a few minutes. Bon Apetit!

  1. Hike and go mountain biking – there are over 90 kilometers of trails!

In Hossa you will find suitable trails for mountain biking as well as hiking – over 90 kilometres altogether. You could easily hike for a week. Routes are marked clearly, so you don’t need to worry about getting lost. You can get maps for the area from the nature centre, and local guides will advise you on an  interesting route suitable for your needs. An accessible nature trail, from which you can admire Hossa’s nature with children’s pushchairs or a wheelchair, departs from the nature centre and is about half a kilometre in length.

  1. Feel the ancient atmosphere on the canyon lake of Julma-Ölkky

This incredible canyon lake is one of the most mystical places in all of Finland. About 3km of  steep canyon walls reach up 50 metres towards the sky –  and under the water’s surface, the walls continue down into almost bottomless depths. The lake, proudly resting in the gorge is surrounded by untouched wild nature, a trekker’s paradise. You can admire the view of Julma-Ölkky by hiking the 10 km circular route from the gorge’s edge, or marvel at the canyon walls from the lake’s surface by boat, canoe or kayak.

Photo: Antti Huttunen

Photo: Antti Huttunen

  1. Hossa was inhabited by humans  thousands of years ago – here is their message to you.

The wall that rises straight out of Somerjärvi lake tells an interesting tale: that man has lived in these wild lands for thousands of years. These rock paintings, which are 3500-4500 years old, are the northernmost in our country. Over 60 different pictures have been found on the rock. Amongst them is a human-like figure with antlers, which could well represent a shaman. The route that detours to Värikallio is 8 km in total, and in winter you can get there by skiing. A viewing platform has been built in front of the rock, so it’s relatively effortless to go and admire this ancient work of art.

  1. So, you think reindeer can only be found in Lapland?

When you are travelling through Hossa it’s highly likely that you will meet some reindeer. You may come across a reindeer on the road or in the forest, or  even see them strolling through a meadow or someone’s garden. Reindeer are semi-wild: they wander through all kinds of terrain, wherever takes their fancy. If you want to visit a real reindeer farm and see some of these creatures up close, stop off at Hossa Reindeer Park.

Photo: Antti Huttunen

Photo: Antti Huttunen

  1. Take a rest in nature’s embrace – this lean-to is an idyllic spot

Along Hossa’s routes there are plenty of huts, campfire sites and lean-to shelters, where you can stop, camp and make a fire. The location of the lean-to at Muikkupuro brook is one of the most picturesque in all of Finland. You can get to the lean-to by walking around a kilometre through a delightful wide forest path. You can sit in the lean-to, light a fire, enjoy a picnic and even sleep. In front of the leant-to is a shallow, sandy-bottomed and clear brook, which feels heavenly to wade in barefoot. The spot is between two lakes and both lakes open out onto a lovely untamed landscape.

  1. Fall into deep snow and savour the frosty air

In winter Hossa is overcome with snow and sub-zero temperatures, turning this summer paradise into a winter wonderland. There is so much snow, that it’s hard to even describe – you just have to experience it. The area is a great place for skiing, snowshoeing and admiring the Northern Lights. Another popular past-time to try is ice-fishing. Hossa’s waterways are teeming with fish!

  1. Swim, dive and try stand-up paddling in the crystal clear waters of Hossa

In Hossa there are abundant lakes, whose sandy beaches and clear waters tempt one to plunge right in. In Finland you can swim freely almost anywhere under Everyman’s Rights, as long as you’re not bobbing around next to someone’s private shore. In the summer, Hossa’s lakes are pleasantly warm. Take diving goggles and a snorkel with you, for you can see far in the clear water.

You can also rent stand up paddle boards  from Camping Hossa Lumo and enjoy stand up paddling from the camping area’s stunning sandy beach. Other equipment available for rent includes kayaks, canoes and rowing boats. The camping area is run by local Maija Daly and her husband, Irishman Lenny Daly.

Maija Daly runs Camping Hossan Lumo.

Getting to Hossa

It is advisable to come to Hossa by car, as public transport does not currently come to this out of the way idyll. If flying to the region, the nearest airports are: Kuusamo, Kajaani or Oulu, from where you can hire a car and drive into the midst of Hossa’s unforgettable landscapes.

Hossa on the map

Translated by Becky Hastings.