Posts

Admiring the beauty of autumn from the highest point in the national park of Pyhä-Luosto

➡️ 14 km
🔥 3
📌 Location
⚫⚫⚫ Challenging

Since the weather was perfect to go on a bit more challenging hike, I decided to pay a visit to Noitatunturi fell located in Pyhä. This hike has been on my mind for quite some time now, but since the weather has to be good (dry, no snow etc.) I still hadn’t had the chance to actually go, until now! Of course my huskies, my partner and a friend were excited to join me, so off we went!

We started our hike from the parking area of hotel Pyhätunturi and headed in the direction of the Isokuru lapp hut. From there we made our way down by using the staircase and started following ‘the trail to Noitatunturi fell‘ which is marked with the colour green.

The trail is quite demanding since there are a lot of rocks and steep climbs to get to the top of the fell, but the trip is totally worth it, especially because of the constantly changing scenery. At the beginning of the trail the autumn colours were still doing their best to develop. Once we were a little bit further along the trail, the autumn colours were starting to fill the scenery and they made us even more excited to make our journey to the top.

Since this was a very tough trail for us, it was even harder for my huskies, especially for my puppy. Even though he is not that small anymore (6 months old), he is still not allowed to walk these kind of heavy trails. Luckily he is trained to sit in a backpack, but this is probably going to be the last time we’ll use the backpack for him (you might understand this when you see the picture below).

After some hard work we finally arrived to the top, which meant that the toughest part of the trail was now behind us. We took some time to enjoy the spectacular view and took a little break for a drink and some fresh berries.

We continued our hike by making our way down the fell towards the Isokuru gorge. This part of the national park of Pyhä-Luosto is probably the most popular place to visit, which I totally understand since it is absolutely stunning. But the Isokuru gorge is not only pretty on the eyes – it is a big part of the cultural history. For instance Pyhänkasteenputous Waterfall, which is located in the gorge, is a holy place for the Sami people.

Want to know more about Pyhä’s history? Then go check out this article!

Making your way through the gorge is really easy nowadays, since there is a well maintained wooden pathway and staircases. There is also a trail that will lead you through the gorge without having to climb Noitatunturi, ‘Karhunjuomalampi trail‘.

At the end of the gorge there is a staircase leading back to Isokuru lapp hut, from where we made our way back to the car again.

Now matter how tired and sore our feet were afterwards, we wouldn’t have wanted to miss the great memories of hiking this trail with it’s amazing scenery. Not sure if our dogs were thinking the same, only thing I do know is that they felt the same tiredness as we did, they almost slept through the whole following day. Luckily we have some great pictures to remember Noitatunturi dressed in the most stunning autumn colours, before they will be buried underneath the snow again.

Taking in the nature in Pyhä-Luosto national park: Rykimäkero trail

➡️ Rykimäkero trail 12–14 km
🕒 3–4 Hours
🔥 4
📌
⚫⚪⚪ Easy route

In my mind the best way to spend a free afternoon is to go outside and enjoy the nature, so this is what I decided to do on a beautiful sunny day. I packed my stuff, prepared my dogs to go on another adventure and headed to the national park of Pyhä-Luosto.

We started at the Rykimäkero parking area and from here we followed the Rykimäkero trail (more information about the trail and how to get there can be found below).

On the trail there is located an amethist mine. If you are planning to bringing it a visit, this trail is a perfect way to get there. But remember to check their website for the opening hours before you make your way there!

By following the trail you will come across different kinds of paths and parts of the forest. One moment your are making your way through the swamp on some duckboards, and the next you are following a dirt road between the trees. But this is what makes the trail so special: the changing scenery makes you experience the different aspect of nature that Lapland has to offer.

During the hike my dogs suddenly got restless. They started sniffing every little leaf and rock that crossed their path, hoping that it will give away the location of the thing that leaves behind a certain scent that they had picked up on. It only took a couple of meters until a reindeer decided to pop out from between the trees. It happens quite often that we come across these beautiful animals during a hike. Sadly, my huskies don’t have the best intentions when meeting these creatures, so we had to move on pretty quickly.

Along the trail there are a lot of shelter places where you can make a fire, enjoy some lunch or just take a little break. Just remember to leave everything the way you found it, without any waste or damage, so we can enjoy these shelters for many years to come!

During one of our breaks a couple of siberian jays decided to give us a little show. They flew from tree to tree and made it look like they were dancing in the sky. Sadly I didn’t have the right equipment to get this photographed. But if you are lucky and quiet, you might experience this as well during your visit!

During my hike there were a lot of ripe bilberries and cloudberries at the side of the trail, so we decided to pick some as a snack and to bring home. My huskies think of the bilberries as nature’s free dogtreat, which makes it a little harder to actually have any berries left to bring home.

Close to the end of our hike we came across the gorge of Rykimäkero. This gorge originated when the rockbed started to tear. It’s a beautiful place to sit down and take some time to admire the power of nature. There is also a shelter, named Rykimäkuru, next to the gorge.

After this our hike came to an end. We were all satisfied by the things we had seen and experienced and can’t wait for the fall colors to start showing. Then we will follow the same trail once again and enjoy the beauty that autumn season gives us.

More information about the Rykimäkero trail and how to get there can be found here >>

I like to use this pdf-map to find my way through the national park. All the shelters and rest places can also be found on this map.

Catching the end of the midnight sun in Pyhä-Luosto national park

➡ +/- 5 km
🔥 1 campfire site
📌 Location on the map
⚫⚫⚪ Moderate

If you visit Lapland in summer you can’t get around it, the midnight sun! It’s an amazing natural phenomenon above the arctic circle that brings us daylight for 24 hours a day during a big part of summer. This is because the sun doesn’t set for a couple of days or weeks (depending on your location).

It’s really special to experience the midnight sun for the first time, my first time wasn’t that long ago! You feel revived and full of energy, especially after the dark and cold winters we have here in Lapland.

Even though the midnight sun is really special, it’s also a special time when the sun will set again, so I decided to take a look at it from the mountains in Pyhä-Luosto national park.

I know my way around the area and the trails and decide to take my favourite hike up the hill, following the Luosto nature Hiking trail ( more information below).

The beginning of the trail isn’t that scenic but after about 10 minutes the views are only getting better by every step you take. The trail can be quite steep and rocky but it’s totally worth it once you see the view.

During the hike I could just hear the paws of my dogs making their way through the bushes and over the stones just making their way to the top with me, not knowing what was waiting for them.

Once me and my dogs arrived at the top we took some time to rest, get some treats and enjoy the view and sounds of nature while waiting for the sun to set.

Once the sun had set we made our way back down through the same trail that brought us to the top while keeping the beautiful views in our minds. And realizing that winter is just around the corner again. Then we can enjoy the beautiful Northern lights at the exact same spot.

 

Information about the national park, how to get there and the trail can be found here.

I personally use this map! The trail I followed (until the top is reached) is called Luosto nature Hiking trail 18km, green colour.

 

 

 

Different moods of Pyhä-Luosto National Park

One of my favourite places in the world is Pyhä-Luosto National Park. Fells are all that is left of ancient mountains. Although Pyhä-Luosto is a skiresort with extensive winter activities, I think the most magical time to visit this park is Summer or Autumn. Here are a few pictures that I have taken over the years.

Snow blowers working.

Autumn is the time of mystics. Fog and bright colors are great reasons to spend a few days in Pyhä-Luosto.

Sometimes the light almost gets through

Beautiful fall colours and Pyhänkasteenputous waterfall

Silently waiting

On the other hand in the summer there is light 24 hours a day. Lapland’s summer is swift but bright. Make sure you are not visiting Lapland during “räkkä” a.k.a. the worst mosquito time. End of July and August are great for hiking and mosquitos won’t bother you too much.

Between fells there is a paradise

Uhriharju lookout during summer

Midnight view on top of Pyhätunturi fell

Moonlight reveals foggy terrain

Of course in Lapland you will run into reindeer. Some times the clouds are so low that the only clear place is on top of the fells.

The Alfa and the herd

Above the clouds

Midnight sun, as they call it, is the opposite of polar night. Basically summer is light and winter is dark. Very dark and cold. There are sunlight only for a few hours a day, maybe not even that.

Sunset turning to sunrise

Ancient mountains have been swiped away by ice ages and erosion. This is what is left of the majestic mountains.

Old stones

Mystical autumn

Isokuru gorge during summer

 

Kingdom of two giant fells: Pyhä-Luosto national park

The Pyhä-Luosto National Park in central Lapland is the kingdom of two giant fells. In the west, the handsome Ukko-Luosto dominates the landscape and in the east stands the ancient Pyhätunturi. There are many other peaks in the area, such as the mythical Noitatunturi, as well as impressive beautiful forests and ponds to fall in love with. The absolute experience for the first time visitor is the incredible Isokuru, one of the most powerful landscapes in Lapland.

Find your cottage at Pyhä-Luosto

Surely you know the wonderful feeling when after an all day trip you can get back into the cozy cottage and chat with the family or friends about the events of the day, while planning the next day’s trips? Comfortable cottage is a great base for hikers!

Cabin gems of the Pyhätunturi are available here >>

You’ll book and find the best cabins of Luosto here >>

Pyhä-Luosto is a versatile hiking area all year round and it is constantly growing popular with snowshoerd and fatbikers. Good routes and fireplaces provide an insight into both day trips and longer hikes.

At the base of Pyhätunturi, there is a wonderful Nature Center Naava, where a lunch restaurant and a souvenir shop are located. There are plenty of services for the needs of various hikers and explorers in the Pyhä and Luosto area. In addition to the versatile equipment rental, you can stroke cute reindeer at the reindeer farm, participate in a husky or snowmobile safari or even try ice climbing.

Easy to acces with public transport

It is easy to reach Pyhä-Luosto with your own car: the car can be left at either Pyhä, Luosto or the parking places between the fells. Trains and flights arriving to Rovaniemi and Kemijärvi have a bus service to Pyhä-Luosto around the year. The bus from both towns to Pyhä and Luosto drives daily. You can find timetables and more information at Matkahuolto’s website. Bus line goes also between the fells. For more information on how to arrive in Pyhä-Luosto you will find here.

First time at Pyhä-Luosto?

The Pyhä-Luosto National Park offers an excellent setting for photographing the northern lights, and you will also be able to get acquainted with Siberian Jays which enjoy the company of hikers. We also recommend to have a snack at Torvisen maja café. It’s a sympathetic café where the peaceful atmosphere is at its place without electricity and running water.

We want to recommend these unbelievably beautiful hiking trails:

  • Karhujuomalampi trail, 10km: The Circle trail is attracted with the impressive Isokuru and the picturesque Pyhäkastelampi. Remember that the entire Isokuru area is a restricted area of the National Park where deviation from the marked route is prohibited!
  • Tunturiaapa natural trail, 5-7km: Circle trail travels across fell and marsh areas and has a bird-watching tower on the way.
  • Noitatunturi, 15km: A demanding circle trail which goes across Isokuru, the waterfall of Pyhäkaste and the bond of Karhunjuomalammi
  • Ukko-Luosto, 6,5km: You can hike around Ukko-Luosto and stop by the top of the fell.

Read more about Pyhä-Luosto national park here.

Photos by Jonna Saari.

The largest nationalpark of Finland – Lemmenjoki

In Lemmenjoki national park you can experience the true northern wilderness. One of the biggest wilderness areas in Europe takes place in the municipality of Inari in Lapland, right next to the Norwegian border.

The name Lemmenjoki means “River of Love”. You can start the trip by going to Njurgulahti village where you can get boat rides or rent a canoe.

We went to the river for three days with our canoe to enjoy the autumn foliage of Lapland. Timing was perfect and the colors were unimaginable.

Bog billberrys colored the riverside with red and purple, and the birches took their final breath before the great winter and painted their leaves with yellow and orange.

The fells turned to red and almost golden from mountain bearberry and other shrubs.

The river flows calmly and patiently in here, where time seems to stop.

No matter in which direction you go, there is only true wilderness.

One of the greatest places in the world.

At the edge of the sky

Volunteering in a National Park, in addition to hard work, contains some serious hiking.

On our second week in August 2016 we came to Pallas, so an opportunity to finally scale the Taivaskero Fell arose. On our last visit here we had to skip it due to extreme conditions. Taivaskero is the tallest one in the chain of fells, towering at 807 meters above sea level.

The weather was spectacular by the time our shift ended at 3 o’clock so after a tasty communal work meal we took on the fell. The sun was already pretty low and we witnessed a wonderful halo phenomenon on our way up.

The path to Taivaskero starts from the courtyard of Pallas Hotel with a “light” 4 kilometer ascend. You’ll come across an intersection with a sign post and from there it’s about a kilometer of rocky uphill. I wouldn’t recommend the route to anyone with bad feet. On your way and once you get there, remember to look back every once in a while. The top of Taivaskero is broad and wide so there are plenty of different landscapes available. On the highest point you’ll find a pile of rocks with a plaque commemorating the lighting of the Olympic torch in 1952. They had to replace it due to skiers damaging it when trying to scrape snow and ice off to get a clear view of the plaque.

Taivaskero is also known for its ferocious winds. So even if you don’t feel a breeze at the hotel, practice extreme caution once you get all the way up.

The path goes along the Laukkukero fell and continues down the ski-lift trail. The view is incredible the whole way down.

On a clear day you can see into amazing distances and the light preceeding the sunset looks mezmerising. The opposing skyline was all in pastel colors.

On our hike we noticed a hang glider up in the sky. They were up there for the entire time. I bet the view was even more stunning from their perspective.

The return toward the hotel is a steep path down but about half way there we turned left at a”To the hotel” sign. We followed a small path serpenting down the hill. The almost ghost-like woods we walked through took us right to the backyard of the hotel.

If you’re ever around Pallas or on the Hetta-Pallas hike, be sure to take the extra mile to see Taivaskero. It really is worth it.

//Anne

In August through September of 2016 we were volunteering at Pallas-Ylläs National Park. We applied a new coat of paint to several huts and other buildings, first in Hetta’s Pyhäkero and later around the vicinity of Pallaskota. Everything involving this particular experience can be found under the tag National Park Volunteers. That and The earlier adventure aka our first Lapland hike can be found here.

This article was originally published on Likelygonehiking.com.

Sunbathing on Red Sand

Punainenhiekka (The Red Sand) is a long beach at the Southern edge of Pallasjärvi Lake. Like the name suggests, the sand is red in color, making it stand out from the rest of the paler beaches along what is often referred to as The Sea of Lapland.

It’s a popular beach but as you’d imagine, late August (and especially after the Rauli storm), isn’t exactly sunbathing season.

I was even wearing a beanie. The beach was beautiful and the howing wind felt refreshing, though. I must be a little daft, preferring Autumn weather over hot Summer days.

The place was made for chasing Auroras, with the fells lining up in the distance. But a creeping feeling of an uncoming cold kept us from pitching our tent. Don’t worry, we did witness those radiant masterpieces later, on Monday and at the lawn of our accommodation.

At the wilderness hut near the beach we ran into a group of women busy having a photoshoot inside. HandMadeInRaattama, they were called. So we prepared our food outside.

After they were done interviewing and taking photos, it was our turn to take ours. The hut was adorable! Plenty of room and you couldn’t ask for a better view. There’s also a firepit on the beach and it’s only half a kilometer away from the road.

//Anne

In August through September of 2016 we were volunteering at Pallas-Ylläs National Park. We applied a new coat of paint to several huts and other buildings, first in Hetta’s Pyhäkero and later around the vicinity of Pallaskota. Everything involving this particular experience can be found under the tag National Park Volunteers. That and The earlier adventure aka our first Lapland hike can be found here.

This article was originally published on Likelygonehiking.com.

Skiing in the Arctic Night

In midwinter there is light for only a couple of hours a day in Lapland. We decided to go for a two day skiing trip in Pallas-Yllästunturi National Park, to get a proper feel of the darkness during the shortest days of the year in December.

The route was marked on the map, starting from Koivarova parking lot, and went around Keimiötunturi and Sammaltunturi fells in Pallas-Yllästunturi National Park. The plan was to stay the night in one of the three open huts on the route, depending on how quickly we could move in the snow with sledges.

Packing in the parking lot. Me and my friends Pipsa and Salla had long skis, forest skis, special for deep snow. Our sleeping bags and food was packed in two sledges, inside waterproof bags.

The weather was not on our side

It was just above zero degrees of Celsius, around +2 C, when we started the journey. This is bad news for skiing. Snowflakes melt too much under the ski and there is absolutely no traction whatsoever. The skis glide very well, but without traction there is literally no way you can pull a sledge behind you.

We added some grip wax on all skis after the first 20 meters but the effect was minimal. I wished I had hairy skins to put under my skis. They would have worked.

So the first couple of hours our journey proceeded very slowly. It was nearly one meter ahead and two backwards, if there was even the tiniest hill. Our spirits were still high, but we started thinking maybe we have to stay the night at the first open hut only 4 kilometres away at lake Keimiöjärvi. At least there was a lovely sunset to enjoy, and the great Keimiö fell on our left side kept us company.

Me pulling the sledge. Luckily the track was visible, it was cleared by snowmobile. In deep powder snow we would have been exhausted in no time.

When finally reaching the first hut, Keimiöjärvi autiotupa, it was lunch time. We went to sit inside. There was everything one needs for perfect camping: firewood, a stove, some buckets to fetch snow in and pans so you can melt the snow for drinking or food. Sleeping places for 3 people, more if you squeeze. A dry toilet outside. Someone had left many candles on the big table which made me very happy.

Across the frozen lake and into the darkness

After lunch break it was only 2 pm, so we decided to keep going. It was always possible to return to this hut if the journey wouldn’t proceed at all due to non-existent grip. The second hut, Mustakero, we had to forget as it was situated on top of hill. No way we could climb up in this snow.

It was getting dark already so we wanted to cross the lake as soon as possible. You never know with frozen lakes, if there is a current or underwater spring that prevents the ice from properly freezing over.

This route was marked though and I felt pretty trusting there wouldn’t be any soft spots in the ice. Still, there was nervousness in the air. We had forgotten to bring ice claws. You should never cross unfamiliar waters without them, ice claws literally save your life if you fall in. You smash them on the ice and pull yourself up.

Crossing the lake, leaving the Keimiöjärvi open hut behind.

After crossing the lake with no casualties (phew), our path continued in the dark. The funny thing about darkness is, it never really is pitch black when there is snow on the ground. I didn’t even want to turn my headlamp on. I could see shades and trees, the fells around me. And I could see the amazing sky with a zillion stars!

What you don’t see, is depth. Downhills on our way were not steep, but all three of us managed to fall many times! Luckily snow was soft and there was a lot of it. The sledge is funny when coming downhill: first you have to pull it for the initial glide. Then gravity takes over and you feel a push on your back, as the sledge gives you extra speed! I wouldn’t dare to slide down a steep big hill, the speed would accelerate so fast I wouldn’t be able to do anything but yell.

Mustavaara hut

After the last rays of light were gone by 2.30 pm, the temperature dropped below zero, just enough to get some grip back. Our expedition managed to actually ski ahead now! Before no time we had travelled 5 km from the first hut to Mustavaara, an old reindeer herders’ hut. It has been estimated that this hut was built in the end of 1800’s, making it the oldest hut in the whole Pallas-Ylläs National Park.

Melting snow for drinking water.

In summer time there is drinking water practically everywhere. The waters in Lapland are so pure. In winter, you melt it from snow. But snow takes quite a while longer to bring to boil than liquid water, as you might recall from chemistry lessons. Still, it took surprisingly long, I thought.

For dinner we made avocado pasta, not the most traditional of Finnish dishes, but very quick to prepare and absolutely yummy!

The cute and old hut Mustavaara. Imagine this too is complete free for everyone to enjoy! Many thanks to Metsähallitus, the Finnish Administration of Forests, for the maintenance and firewood.

The next day

Our expedition team didn’t sleep too well as there were mice rattling (don’t leave food laying around) and wind howling in a snow blizzard. But we were more than happy to have experienced this old hut. After breakfast it was time to get going as daylight would last, again, for only a couple of hours.

Today it was about -2 C, just enough to get a decent grip of the snow. The way back around the fells was 15 km so it was going to be a long way – or not, depending on the path. The first 7 km were in great shape with hard path made by snowmobile. There were even proper ski tracks all the way from Mustavaara hut to hotel Jeris, 7 km leg. Our forest skis were too wide to fit the tracks though, they were meant for normal cross-country skis.

Skiing in deep snow

The last 7 km leg was something else. This part of the route hadn’t been opened, I don’t know why. Or perhaps it had snowed so much the track had been covered. It was quite a struggle as we had to cram in unbroken snow, in the dark. The benefit of tall, wide skis is that they glide better on top of snow. That is, IF the snow is hard enough to carry your weight. This snow was powder fresh fluff and we sank right through. We took turns in opening the route.

Also the terrain changed to very hilly. It was ever-changing uphill – downhill for at least 3 km. The last leg goes next to a reindeer fence so you can’t get lost. You just need to find the gate where you started off.

Obviously it’s hard to take good pictures when it is dark, but most of the time our skiing trip looked liked this.

It was fine with a good headlamp, but my friends had very dim headlamps and couldn’t see where they were skiing. Imagine skiing down at high speed in complete darkness without knowing where you will end up! They took it well though, and by that I mean, they landed softly when falling in the snow – with head first, butt first, sideways, you name it. I fell too, even though I had a good lamp and thus, no excuses…

Finally we recognised the gate in the fence and yelled out of excitement. It was a fun, challenging trip, I learned a lot about skiing in snow that keeps changing its form.

Starting point on the map

coordinates: lat:67° 55′ 18,488″ lon: 24° 9′ 35,108″

These holy fells are two billion years old – Pyhä area, Lapland

Pyhä area in Lapland is a row of beautiful fells. The name Pyhä means holy. They looked special in the eye of the ancient Sámi people, but also geologically these fells are something else: They’ve been around for two billion years. The round fells we see today are the roots of ancient high and mighty mountains. Come and see for yourself! But respect the sacred surroundings.

Noitatunturi, “the Witch Fell” is an old sacrificial place and the highest peak of Pyhä fells, reaching 540 m. Photo: Joona Kivinen

Sacred place for the Sámi people

The fells and the grand gorges between them look so unique that the ancient Forest Sámi people held the place sacred. There are several sacrificial and worship places, “seita”, in the area that you can visit. A seita can be a unique rock formation or special kind of a tree. It was believed that spirits and gods lived in such places.

pyha_isokuru1

Isokuru is the deepest gorge in Finland, plunging down 220 meters. It is 1,5 km long.

pyha2_2

On the bottom, there are many stories from the past if you pay attention. For instance, in the summer you see wave figures in the rocks, reminding of the time this place was under water.

Geological wonderland

Besides being culturally important, the Pyhä fells are special regarding the whole history of our planet: They belong to the oldest mountains in the world!

The age of the Earth is 4,5 billion years. The age of the main rock type (quartzite) in Pyhä fells has been dated to 1,9-1,8 billion years. These round cuties of today used to be massive mountains, reaching 4 km in height! Kind of like the Alps look today. Except that the Alps are wearing nappies compared to the ancient Pyhä fells, as they are only around 55 million years old. The difference in age is so huge it is hard to grasp.

The ice ages have done their part in sculpting the area. Massive glacier, as high as 3 km, has gone back and forth with warming and cooling climate and has rubbed the sharpness off the fells. Melting water from the glacier has gone through the gorges, carving them deeper and deeper.

pyha3

These Pyhä fells have seen it all. Literally. They have been here for half of the Earth’s lifetime.

Enjoy the National Park

In Pyhä-Luosto National Park there are many marked nature trails for your enjoyment all year round: Up the fells, down to the gorges or out to the open wetland on duckboards.

Whether you are into ancient cultures, geology, extreme sports or blissful nature, Pyhä has it all.

It is December and the day light is short. You only have a couple of hours of light, before having to turn the headlamp on. Then again, at noon it is both sunrise and sunset at the same time so the sky is just breathtaking. Then darkness falls for another 20 or so hours. But you have plenty of time to enjoy the northern lights…

Pyhä Visitor Centre

Map