There is a Game of Thrones themed hotel, and it is made of ice and snow and a little bit of magic – You must see these pictures!

In Lainio village of Kittilä, there is a snow village and a hotel, which rebuilt every year in November, when winter has came. This year, they worked together with the HBO Nordic and result is out of this world.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

Winter is here. There’s no doubt. They created a stunning Game of Thrones-themed hotel, which is built entirely of snow and ice. The hotel is decorated with snow and ice sculptures inspired by tv-series.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

There are icy Iron Throne, and a Mountain watching (I hope your relationship with the Cercei is ok).

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

A bar with dragon sculptures to have drinks of fire and ice.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

A snowy Westeros map on the wall.

About  20 million kilograms of snow and 350 000 kilograms of natural ice are used to build this spectacular place.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

Of course there is the Dragon slide, wanna try?

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

Guests can enter the Hall of Faces.

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

How about a wedding night in White Walker suite? Don’t forget the dragonglass!

(Pic: Tuomas Kurtakko)

Sculptures were made by nine best professional icesculptor from all over the world: from Russia, Ukraine and Poland, then had to Latvia.

Wanna have a room? Book here.

Wanna visit?

Snow Village is open for visitors daily 10-22. Last entrance is 21:00.

Address

Lapland Hotels Snow Village
Lainiotie 566
99120 Kittilä

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Come to the dark side, we have lightkayaks

Repovesi is one of Finland’s most popular national parks in the summer time, but when winter arrives, there is hardly anybody. November is perhaps the least popular month to go in the nature. That is why I believe it is the best time to see familiar places in a new way.

In November, the day in Finland is short. When the weather is cloudy, there is almost no light.

That’s why we were in Repovesi in November. We wanted to find a different view to it. To experience a familiar place with a new twist. We also wanted to test an idea to fill an Orukayak with bright LED-lights and see what happens.

Tony from Tentsile Finland prepared the kayak. I tried to make a fire, just because of security. In less than 15 minutes the angular box was transformed to a real kayak. In this point we read through the plan. Let’s fill a rickety kayak with the electrical equipment, and then go to paddle on the over-frozen water. After it gets dark, of course.

On the water you are as close to the nature as possible. Now it was the last chances this year. A few days later, all lakes could be frozen.

We walked to the shoreline. The snowy forest that we passed was illuminated by the kayak. It was so beautiful that we needed to stop for a couple of times just to shoot some photos. Even I had had some doubts in the morning, but now I had a feeling that all the effort is surely going to pay off.

Now it was time to put the kayak on the water and jump aboard. I was amazed. The sight was something incredibly beautiful, way finer than what I had imagined.

The only colors in nature were black and white. Calm water and the reflected image in the middle of the silence.

The kayak glided silently. The moment was so perfect, that it felt almost bad to break the surface of the water with a paddle stroke. This moment was not for the busy ones.

The bright light made the darkness surrounding us feel ever deeper. The water surface reflected light. The darkness was filled with magic. Light in the darkness is an unforgettable experience. Long live the darkness!

May the forest be with you.

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Raven’s Tour (Korpinkierros) Wilderness Trail in Nuuksio National Park, Espoo

➡️ 8 km
? 2-3 h
⚫⚫⚪ Moderate
? Campfire sites and cooking shelter
The route is marked with yellow markings on the trees, and the trail has signposts.

 

Korpinkierros, The “Raven’s Tour”, is a circular wilderness trail in the Nuuksio National Park. The trail is the most popular circular trail in Nuuksio. If you have only two hours time for Nuuksio, this route is what we highly recommend.  An eight-kilometer loop starts at the Haukanpesä information center, at Haukkalampi witch is easy to find and only 30 kilometres from the centre of Helsinki.

Korpinkierros | Nuuksio, Finland

The start of the trail passes through moss-covered terrain under spruce trees. As you approach Lake Mustalampi where you can see the turf floats on the pond, among other things. There is also the campfire site on the hill.

Korpinkierros | Nuuksio, Finland

After Lake Mustalampi, the trail rises on the Rajakallio hill and continues to vary, travelling through the forest. Next campfire sites at Lake Holma-Saarijärvi, one on an island, and another on the other right next to the shore on the other side of the lake.

Korpinkierros | Nuuksio, Finland

It takes a bit over two hours to walk the trail withtime to have occasional stops for the scenery. The untouched nature of the national park is the best part of the experience.A peaceful environment is good for hiking, not too difficult but slightly challenging. It’s also possible to walk only half the route if entering and exiting Nuuksio with different buses.

Korpinkierros | Nuuksio, Finland

Suitability

The trail is ideal for those looking for slightly challenging route with best views. There are a few short challenging sections on the trail: relatively steep hills and varying surface. Most of the trail goes over gently rising rocks and  duckboards, which both can be slippery to walk when wet. There are some wet spots on the trail but most of times it is possible to use normal light footwear on the trail.

How to get there?
Haukkalammentie 29
02820 Espoo
N60 18.581 E24 31.017

It is located only 30 km from the center of Helsinki. First take train line U from Helsinki Center Railway Station and go to the Espoo Center, Espoon keskus railway station. The train take about 32 minutes. From Espoon keskus take the bus number 245A, it will take you to the Nuuksio.

Greetings from Santa’s homeland – this is what winter in Lapland actually looks like!

Greetings from Santa’s homeland!

See what winter in Lapland actually looks like. These 12 photos were taken in different parts of Lapland and they were selected by us especially for you. Merry Christmas everybody!

Auroras above a farm in Kittilä.

Ounasjoki river, Rovaniemi.

Frozen door. Saariselkä, Inari.

Dog in a white forest in Sodankylä.

Reindeer on a frozen river bank in Kittilä.

Sudden snowfall in Sodankylä.

Auroras above a reindeer fence in Utsjoki.

Noon in northern Finland during the polar night.

Forest of old pine trees, Sodankylä.

Fishermen’s cabins by lake Jerisjärvi in Muonio.

Äkäsjoki river in Muonio.

Samoyed dogs looking at river Teno in Utsjoki.

Northern Lights in Silence

The majority of the world’s people have never seen northern lights with their own eyes. Only 2% of the world’s population lives in an area where you can see northern lights. The Finnish Lapland is one of them.

Electrically charged particles (electrons and protons) burst out from the Sun and enter the Earth’s atmosphere at a speed of up to a thousand kilometres an hour. This current of particles is called solar wind. The blasts of solar wind cause northern lights and other phenomena of space weather. A part of the particles penetrates the Earth’s magnetic field and is directed to the Earth’s polar regions, where they collide with particles of the atmosphere at an altitude of 100–300 kilometres. This creates an overwhelmingly beautiful play of nature as colours change from yellow-green to red.

In the Southern hemisphere, you can only see northern lights in the Antarctic. In the Northern hemisphere, northern lights are plentiful from the arctic circle to 75 degrees north. However, this thousand-kilometre-wide band is not accessible to all. The region is mostly sea, extending to Spitzbergen, central Greenland and northern parts of Alaska and Siberia where the population is sparse and communications poor. Canada in North America as well as Iceland, Finland and Norway in Europe are thus excellent places to observe northern lights.

The northern lights’ season begins in the Finnish Lapland in August, when nights grow longer.

Then it is possible to see ‘double northern lights’, which are northern lights in the sky and their reflection on the surface of the water. In the autumn, you can also see them as a reflection from the surface of black ice. We call this the double aurora effect”, says Ilkka Länkinen, proprietor of Arctic TreeHouse hotel, which specialises in northern lights’ tourism.

The Arctic TreeHouse Hotel is located near the arctic circle in Rovaniemi. Its rooms have been designed specifically for viewing northern lights. The northern wall of all the rooms is all glass. The rooms have been graded so that they give to different directions. All hotel guests see mostly Lappish nature from their rooms – and hopefully northern lights.

The Arctic TreeHouse Hotel is located near the arctic circle in Rovaniemi. Its rooms have been designed specifically for viewing northern lights.

The hotel monitors the northern lights’ forecasts of the Sodankylä geophysical observatory, and it also uses the local Aurora Alert application which notifies the hotel guests’ mobile phones at any time when northern lights are visible.

“I can say from experience that if you stay three nights in the hotel, you will see northern lights with a 90% probability.”

The northern wall of all the rooms is all glass. You can observe the northern lights in peace and quietness from the room. In the picture the reflection of the exit-sign can be seen in the middle of the northern lights.

On a clear night, the average probability of seeing northern lights in the Finnish Lapland at 9 p.m. exceeds 50%. The probability peaks about an hour before midnight, which is the magnetic midnight, and the disturbances of the Earth’s magnetic field are at their greatest. The possibility of seeing northern lights increases the further north you go.

According to the Finnish Meteorological Institute, northern lights are mostly seen in Finland in northern Lapland, at around the latitude of Kilpisjärvi. When the sky is clear, northern lights are observed there on an average of three nights out of four. In order to see northern lights every night you have to go to the Arctic Sea coast in northern Norway.

“We always emphasise to the hotel guests that northern lights are a natural phenomenon, whose occurrence does not depend on us. Till now the tourists have been understanding that they cannot always be seen”,  says the hotel manager, Katri Kerola.

“The guests come to the hotel in the winter mainly because of northern lights. Northern lights cause a nice kind of grouping among the guests. In a little street, twenty people meet in the middle of the night, thrilled and joyful, to view nature’s theatre. The Instagram account of our hotel is filled with visitors’ pictures of northern lights. I come from here, and I too stop to watch them, even if I was in a hurry to get somewhere. Northern lights are Lappish mindfulness.”

A silent nature experience

The gustiness of the solar wind causing northern lights is known to vary in eleven-year cycles. It is connected to the number of sun spots on the surface of the Sun. The probability of the occurrence of northern lights can be predicted by observing the Sun’s surface.If a blast is observed on the surface of the Sun, it can be deduced that northern lights will occur in one or two days.

Staying at the Arctic TreeHouse Hotel is a calming experience. Even if northern lights are not to be seen, you can lie on your large bed and stare at the beautiful forest landscape in silence. Watching television does not even occur to you.

“We have intentionally kept the hotel quiet. There are double-insulated double glasses and a grass thatch overhead, insulating sounds well. The television set is intentionally hidden in the rooms”, Länkinen sneers and emphasises that the hotel was specifically designed to give a nature experience.

“You can watch nature peacefully indoors, irrespective of the weather. The architect’s starting points were a good view, peacefulness and a safe nature experience. Nature comes very near, because the large window makes the guest feel a part of nature”, Ilkka Länkinen says.

Particularly Asians have found the hotel.

“In addition to the British, plenty of tourists from Japan and Singapore come here. China is growing at 300% annually. Many weddings and engagement parties have been held under the glow of northern lights.”

At the Arctic TreeHouse hotel, you can watch northern lights both in water and in the air. At the Metsäkyly forest spa, you can watch northern lights in a jacuzzi after the sauna.

Extreme experience. You can watch northern lights at the jacuzzi of the Metsäkylä Spa.

You can also climb up in the air.

“We offer the hotel guests the possibility to view northern lights at the height of two kilometres. A seven-seat light aircraft takes you on an hour’s trip to where northern lights appear. Because up in the air visibility is 50 kilometres, we will surely have a show of northern lights somewhere.”

Aurora Alert

The Sámis believed that northern lights are created when a fox waves its tail in the snow, creating sparks, “fox fires”, as they are called in Finnish. Picture from the norther lights-documentary from Arktikum.

Aurora Alert is a local northern lights’ forecasting system operating in Rovaniemi. It forecasts and observes northern lights and notifies the customer of the location of northern lights in the sky. Essential in the service is that it only indicates the northern lights the customer can observe.

“The forecast of the Sodankylä geophysical observatory indicates the probability of the occurrence of northern lights. Aurora Alert also takes cloud masses into account. It indicates when northern lights are visible with your own eyes”, explains data communications engineer Reijo Kortesalmi, the developer of the application.

Aurora Alert sends a forecast, probability percentage and alarm to the mobile phone. The application is based on signal processing and colour analysis. Aurora Alert uses its local sensors located in Rovaniemi, serving the northern lights’ tourists of the Rovaniemi area.

Aurora Alert combines data from many sources.

“An indicative forecast comes every night at eight o’clock. The probability percentage indicates what you can observe with your own eyes. A real-time alert comes, for example, if the local cloud curtain opens for five minutes.”

The application also indicates the intensity of the northern lights.

“Number one means that northern lights are clearly observable with one’s own eyes. Number five means that northern lights light up the whole sky. The intensity of northern lights may vary in the course of the evening. At 11 p.m., northern lights may be of level 1, but at 2 a.m. the intensity may be five”, says Kortesalmi.

The duration of northern lights varies as well.

“Weak northern lights may appear for a few minutes, but strong northern lights appear from half an hour to one and a half hours.”

Kortesalmi takes his holiday from April to July, when northern lights are not seen in Rovaniemi. Forecasting and alerting starts again in August.

“Aurora Alert definitely gives the most precise information on northern lights in Rovaniemi.”

Ari Turunen (2017)

This article was originally published by SlowFinland.fi

Happy birthday Finland!

Today Finland is turning 100 years and celebrated it by lighting up one of Finlands most iconic fell, Saana. All the way up north in the town of Kilpisjärvi stands 1029 meters above sea level a fell of which everyone in Finland knows. We went to see how it looks like and it was magnificent.