19 tips for travelling foodies: visit these places to get a true flavour of South East Finland

In co-opetarion with Visit Kouvola, Visit Kotka-Hamina and GoSaimaa

South East Finland has some of the country’s most rugged and wild landscapes with access to excellent services. Only a short journey away from Helsinki, amidst the sounds of rushing rivers and rustling forests, you can find yourself amongst quirky cafes and excellent restaurants. We put together a list of 19 places or local delicacies that every visitor to the area should try.

1. Keisarinmaja Kahvila’s Finnish pancakes are the best in the world

? Address: Keisarinmajantie, Kotka
ℹ Homepage (Facebook)

In 1889 the Russian Tsar Aleksander III commissioned a fishing cottage to be built in the beautiful surroundings of Langinkoski river. It ended up as a stylish villa, where the Tzar with his family and friends spent carefree summer days. These days it houses the lovely Keisarinmaja cafe, whose Finnish pancakes (thick pancakes baked in an oven served with jam and whipped cream) are reported to the be the best in the world.

Photo: Sari Selkälä

2. A cute cafe in a yellow house – with a fantastic view out to Langinkoski river

? Keisarinmajantie, Kotka
ℹ Homepage (Facebook)

The yellow cafe on the shores of Langinkoski river used to be where the guard of the Tsar’s fishing cottage lived with his family. From the cafe terrace there are beautiful views down to the river. The cafe has lots of cozy nooks which also look out onto this view. Lunch is also available daily.

Photo: Sari Selkälä

3. Kymen Paviljonki: food, herbs, farm animals and rapids

Helsingintie 408, Kuusankoski
ℹ Homepage (in Finnish)

If you’re travelling on Route 6 there are many good reasons to stop at Kymen Paviljonki (Kymi Pavilion). Here you can get a decent lunch as well as take a refreshing break from driving. Walk down to Kymijoki river’s shores, get to know the farm animals and explore the wonderful herb garden, where you can pick herbs to serve with your meal.

Photo: Sari Selkälä

4. Relish the campfire atmosphere in Repovesi National Park

Riippusillantie 55, Kouvola
ℹ Read more

Repovesi National Park has many scenic campfire spots perfect for having a picnic in beautiful natural surroundings. You may make a fire in a designated campfire ring as long no fire warning has been issued. Firewood is provided on site.The easiest campfire meal is a hot dog barbecued over the glowing red coals served with whatever relishes of you chose to bring!

Photo: Tomi Pohja

5. Into Repovesi National Park via RepoTassu

Riippusillantie 55, Kouvola
ℹ Homepage (Facebook)

RepoTassu is a great little kiosk at the gate of Repovesi National park, by the Lapinsalmi entrance. Its handy location makes RepoTassu an easy place to stop off on the way in or out and prices are reasonable. There are a wide variety of refreshments available as well as lunch and coffee. You can even reserve a canoe!

Photo: Tomi Pohja

6. Orilammen Maja offers accommodation and great food

Voikoskentie 138, Hillosensalmi
ℹ Homepage

Orilammen Maja is legendary in the Repovesi area. This family business has grown over the years into a whole holiday village located right by a lake with lovely views. Here you can feast until your belly is full in peaceful natural surroundings. This place is definitely worth adding to your itinerary if you visit Repovesi National Park.

Photo: Tomi Pohja

7. Historical Fortress island: Fort Elisabeth and Restaurant Vaakku

Varissaari, Kotka
ℹ Homepage

The old sea fortress Fort Elisabeth is also known as Varissaari (Crow Island), and is a popular day trip destination and recreation area in Kotka. From June to August you can get there on board the ferry M/S Klippan from Kotka’s old harbour in Sapokka. The fortress was completed in 1796 and it was named after the Russian Tsarina Elisabeth Petrovna. Although the fortress itself was destroyed in the Crimean war, plenty of relics and monuments from the island’s history remain. As well as offering ‘fun dining in a stately environment’, according to their motto, Restaurant Vaakku also rents out SUP boards and a sauna boat!

Photo: Sari Selkälä

8. At Fortress Restaurant Kamu you can step into Hamina’s history

? Raatihuoneenkatu 12, Hamina
ℹ Homepage

Hamina’s fortress is one of the few ‘star forts’ in Finland. It was based on the one in Palmova in Northern Italy, which represented a utopian city. These types of forts are rare. Both Swedes and Russians have built hefty fortresses in Hamina. In the depths of Hamina’s Bastion, lies the atmospheric Restaurant Kamu, whose delicacies must be tried if visiting the area.

Photo: Julius Koskela

9. Anjala’s Manor House charms against a backdrop of Ankkapurha’s grand rapids

? Ankkapurhantie 15, Anjala
ℹ Homepage

Ankkapurha is the ancient Finnish name for Kymijoki river’s biggest rapids. Although the river has since been tamed to produce hydropower, the milieu of Anjala’s Manor House is still well worth a visit. There are walking trails in the area and all visitors are encouraged to try them and enjoy nature. Foodies should head to the Makasiinikahvila (Warehouse cafe) to sample the coffee and cake.

Photo: Julius Koskela

10. Salmiakki cheddar and hydrogen-powered cars at Kirjokivi manor

? Rudolf Elvingintie 109, Vuohijärvi
ℹ Homepage (in Finnish)

The idyllic Kirjokivi Manor and its surroundings are a sight in themselves, but once you’re there, you can fill your stomach with exotic treats. How does salmiakki (salty liquorice) cheddar cheese sound? Kirjokivi manor house is part of Woikoski Feeling – a company that provides a range of experiences in the surrounding area. The place’s special feature is the car museum, where all the cars reveal interesting parts of Woikoski’s and all of Finland’s history.

Photo: Julius Koskela

11. What on earth are Vety and Atomi? Taste Lappeenranta’s specialities

? Lappeenranta, South Karelia

Vety and Atomi have already gained quite a reputation. These local delicacies can be found at the hotdog kiosk, and should be enjoyed in in Lappeenranta’s urban surroundings, where they might be ordered by locals at the end of a night out. In true Finnish-style, you can wash them down with a glass of milk. Vety is a high quality meat pie, filled with either ham or egg. Atomi is filled with both.

Photo: Julius Koskela

12. Särä is Finnish food, with a thousand year history

ℹ Restaurant Kippurasarvi Homepage

Särä is the oldest dish in Finland, and its history goes back at least 1000 years. The name ‘särä’ comes from the wooden trough, on which lamb and potatoes were served. The meat rests on a bed of potatoes and is dished up with rieska (Finnish flatbread) as an accompaniment and homebrew to drink. Looks pretty good, don’t you think?

Photo: Julius Koskela

13. Melt-in-your-mouth hot smoked salmon in Lohela

? Karjalantie 372, Puntala
ℹ Homepage (in Finnish)

Could this be the world’s best hot smoked salmon? Test for yourself. Many travel from afar to buy Lohela’s smoked salmon to take home, or savour it slowly there and then. The quaint shop there has plenty of other items for sale, including delicacies and souvenirs for the traveller.

Photo: Julius Koskela

14. At Korpikeidas you can fish and meet some other animals

Vesikkolantie 415, Joutseno
ℹ Homepage (in Finnish)

At Korpikeidas you can fish and smoke the salmon yourself. There is a wide range of fun things to do for families with children. You can also get to know the resident farm animals which include an alpaca and a peacock!

Photo: Julius Koskela

15. Pulsan Asema is an instagram hit

? Pulsan Aseman tie 21, Pulsa
ℹ Homepage

Pulsan Asema (Pulsa Station) is an old station building that has been converted into a cafe, interior design boutique and bed and breakfast. The station’s interior decor is very photogenic. You can see the passion that has gone into creating this place. It’s certainly deserving of its media and social media attention, but go see it for yourself!

Photo: Julius Koskela

16. Konditoria Huovila – if there was a cafe in Moominland…

? Fredrikinkatu 1, Hamina
ℹ Homepage (in Finnish)

While wandering the picturesque streets of Hamina, step into Konditoria (Patisserie) Huovila. Its colourful cakes, the cinnamon buns overflowing on the counter and light fresh interior bring to mind the coloured Moomin books from childhood. Now in its third generation of ownership, this cafe is a part of Hamina’s street views. Make sure you at least taste the crown pastries!

Photo: Julius Koskela

17. Discover Ylämaa’s spectrolite in Korupirtti

? Kivikyläntie 7, Ylämaa
ℹ Homepage (in Finnish)

Spectrolite is a dark stone that shimmers blue and gold when held at certain angles in the light. Korupirtti (Jewellery Hut) with its services is a good base for gemstone miners. Next to the hut is the mining museum and it’s also possible to go see the mine itself.

Photo: Julius Koskela

18. Mustila Arboretum fairytale forest and Mustila wine

? Mustilan Puistotie 21, Elimäki
ℹ Homepage

Finnish berries and fruit are known to be superfoods, but did you know that you can make wine from them? Mustila’s wine shop and wonderful garden store is near Kouvola. As well as stopping at the shop, you can go for a work in a real fairytale forest, Mustila’s Arboretum.

Photo: Milla von Konow

19. Viini Verla – a winery in a world heritage site

? Salonsaarentie 127, Verla
ℹ Homepage

The idyllic Verla Mill village is a world heritage site. The old groundwood and board factory’s picturesque mill buildings feel like a journey back in time, within beautiful and photogenic surroundings. When visiting, make sure you stop at Verla Winery (Viini Verla). In addition to their wine and sparkling wines, they make a variety of berry liqueurs and table wines as well as stronger alcoholic drinks.

Photo: Milla von Konow

THREE ISLANDS, TWO NATURE TRAILS AND  A LILY POND: EKENÄS ARCHIPELAGO NATIONAL PARK IS PARADISE FOR PADDLERS

In partnership with Visit Raseborg

Article by Mia Sinisalo

➡ Paddling distance 20km
? 2 Campfire spots: Fladalandet ja Modermagan
ℹ Area information
ℹ Ekenäs Archipelago National Park
Departure point on the map

Everyone I know has some kind of a ‘soul landscape’ – a landscape in which they feel they truly belong. I know people who feel at their most alive in mountains. I know many, who feel most at peace resting on a green bed of moss or wandering in the woods. My heart beats stronger and steadier than ever when I’m in the archipelago of the Baltic Sea.

Ekenäs Archipelago National Park includes lush coastal inner archipelago as well as more rocky and exposed outer archipelago right up to Jussarö lighthouse. Ekenäs Archipelago National Park is a great paddling location. There’s enough to explore for a multi-day trip, but if you’re pushed for time, a lot can be packed into two days. My friend and I decided on a two day route that took us around three islands.

Planning a three island tour

If you’ve completed a paddling course and want to try sea kayaking for the first time, Ekenäs Archipelago National Park is the perfect place to start. Our three island tour is relatively easy to navigate with a sheltered route but all the atmosphere of sea kayaking – the feeling of distance, wind and waves. If for any reason you need to suddenly get to shore, land is never far away.

Ekenäs Archipelago National Park’s 52 square kilometres is made up of many islands, big and small. We chose the inner coastal islands of Älgö, Fladalandet and Mordemagan, which provided the most sheltered route, as well as services to make camp life easier, such as dry toilets and designated campfire and tent sites. Another thing that helped make up our minds was access to marked nature trails, so that we could go stretch our kayak-cramped legs. A map of the overall area is available for download Metsähallitus’s Outdoor.fi page.

A strong and experienced paddler could complete our three island tour in one day – the route’s length is around 20 kilometres with 4-6 hrs of total paddling time, depending on paddling speed and wind. However, we wanted to paddle at a relaxed pace, spend the night in the national park and enjoy peaceful island life, so a two day trip suited our needs better.

Before heading out to sea, we went to the national park’s nature centre, which is next to the guest harbour, to absorb some of the archipelago vibe. The exhibition, which tells you about archipelago life and nature as well as protection of the Baltic sea, is primarily designed for children, but there is plenty for adults to learn too. Near the entrance you can pick up a more general map of the national park, which we took along as a spare.

A good departure point for a kayaking trip is Sommarö Stranden, which is actually 13km from Tammisaari. There’s a restaurant and a small shop, if you want to have something to eat before heading out or have a last minute panic about having packed enough food. There’s a small stretch of beach, as well as a concrete slope, from which kajaks are easy to launch into the water and you can leave your car at the guest harbour.

The three island tour can be done clockwise or anti-clockwise. Check the weather forecast and wind direction before choosing which way to go. Even though the route follows a sheltered route between islands, the wind can still have considerable impact on your paddling. And if you want to sway in a hammock at night, make sure you check which islands have trees and which side they’re on!

Älgö’s Nature Trail and Rödjan’s fishing hut

From Sommarö Stranden we decided to paddle around Älgö island anti-clockwise, aiming for Rödjan fisherman’s hut and the starting point for the nature trail. We were accompanied by an easterly wind and the island sheltered us for the first part. After paddling for an hour, we stopped, carried the kayaks onto the rocks, had something to eat and drink and went for a swim.

We navigated with the help of a marine map and an app on our phones. My friend had the nature centre’s free area map, which is not detailed enough for navigation on its own, but is helpful if you want a quick overview of where you are in relation to the rest of the national park. Mostly we followed the coast of Älgö, but after the stretch of water marked as Mörnsfärd on the island’s north west side, it makes more sense to go around the west sides of Heimosholmen and Halsholmen.

Even though the coastal inner archipelago is mostly sheltered and relatively safe, remember that you’re still at the mercy of the sea and the elements. The weather and direction of the wind can change suddenly and visibility can drop to nothing. This is all worth keeping in mind even on an easy, relaxed paddling trip. Make sure you always know where you are on the map. The route crosses a few boat channels, so be aware and careful of fast-moving boats and the waves that they create.

After about 2,5 hours of paddling, we reached Rödjan. The journey was about 10 km. By the time we arrived, we were already hungry and also quite tired. At the guest harbour there were a couple of beautiful wooden sailing boats and a larger motorboat at the fisherman’s hut. There were a couple of places for kayaks on the right hand side of the fishing hut, on the beach in the nook of the rocks. After we had already spread out our picnic, we realised that we had picked a bad spot, right in the middle of the nature trail’s starting point!

In the postbox at the beginning of the trail, there’s an interesting information pamphlet that tells you about the island’s history, which you can borrow while you walk. For thousands of years, Älgö lay under continental ice, and then water until the land rose. Seals have lounged about on the low outer islands, which have over time become Älgö’s high rocks.

Älgö’s nature trail has a lot of steep climbs and descents. Along the route you can see many bays which become overgrown, different forest types and Älgö’s inner lake. Only half a kilometre along from the starting point is the observation tower, with a view that stretches out across the national park.

After an hour we arrived back at Rödjan’s fisherman’s hut and thought about whether we should continue to the next island. But the evening was drawing in and the idea of getting into our hammocks felt much more appealing than that of paddling. We found the official camping spot on the left of the guest harbour (looking out to sea). The rays of the evening sun danced on the ferns on the leaves, and water lapped on the rocks. This spot had good places for tents as well as perfect trees for hammocks, so the decision was made quickly. We moved the kayaks to a different beach, hung our hammocks in the trees and had strawberries and cream for our evening snack.

Out into the open via Fladalandet bay and fascinating coves

We enjoyed our breakfast in the sun on the rocks, about 50 metres west of our camping spot. After packing our kayaks, we navigated towards Fladalandet, which was just under an hour’s paddling away.

Even though we didn’t go ashore, it’s definitely worth paddling around Fladalandet! On the northern edge is a natural harbour and lots of narrow bays and coves that go deep into the island which can only be reached by kayak or paddleboard. I recommend going to explore each one, for they are all different and interesting in their own way. In windy weather, Fladalandet’s bays provide many sheltered places to come ashore.

On Fladalandet’s south side, is open sea. If you have time and the weather allows, then it’s worth taking a detour to the outer archipelago, for example via Stora Björkskar. But do check which islands you can land on during the summer on the national park’s general map . Many islands are protected due to nesting birds from 1.4-31.7. If you have experience paddling in the open sea, then reserve an extra day and paddle to Jussarö lighthouse island.

A surprise find on Modermagan

During our trip we stayed in the inner archipelago, and after Fladalandet our third island destination was Modermagan. It only takes about half an hour to paddle between the two islands, which we did easily in a light wind. Over the boat channel we paddled a bit faster. There was a lot of boat traffic around midday on the summer’s day. Being so close to the water’s surface, a kayak can’t necessarily be seen from a fast-moving motor boat, so paddlers need to take responsibility for themselves and be aware of boats.

On the southern side of Modermagan, a bay opens out from the inside of the island, into which we paddled. We got some advice on where to shore from a couple of paddlers coming towards us from the opposite direction. At the base of the bay, behind the last reed bed is a shallow beach, which is hidden by the reeds. If you keep paddling along edge of the rocks nearest the reeds, you will find a place to come ashore.

The bay has sheltered places for boats, and even the tent spots are out of the wind. There’s a nice atmosphere on Modermagan. It’s a laid-back holiday island, where you can stay and swim and enjoy camp life for a second day if you wish. We headed out onto the nature trail, which amused us with its signposts. I don’t know who writes and illustrates these, but thank you wherever you are. The sign about mosquito’s paradise made us laugh.

Both Modermagan’s and Älgö’s nature trails are easy to follow. The Rödjan trail on Älgö is marked with blue pinecone shields and Modermagan’s with white wooden posts. Both trails are quite hilly and demand good basic fitness as well as healthy feet.

Just as we thought that Modermagan’s nature trail had ended, a pond appeared in front of us. I’ve never seen so many waterlilies. Archipelago nature is usually quite rocky and bare, so this lily pond stuck out by contrast. It was as if in a fairytale. The only thing missing was a frog prince looking for his princess. You can also swim in the pond, something that we tried and tested.

We went back to our kayaks, had a light meal and exchanged greetings with some boaters. Afterwards we paddled back along Älgö’s east side. In calm, favourable conditions, the journey should only take an hour and a half.

Our car was waiting for us at Sommarö Stranden. We emptied our kayaks and lifted them onto the roof of the car. With our souls feeling so fully restored and recharged, it felt like in only two days we had experienced two weeks of summer and archipelago.

Translation: Becky Hastings

Taking in the nature in Pyhä-Luosto national park: Rykimäkero trail

➡️ Rykimäkero trail 12–14 km
? 3–4 Hours
? 4
?
⚫⚪⚪ Easy route

In my mind the best way to spend a free afternoon is to go outside and enjoy the nature, so this is what I decided to do on a beautiful sunny day. I packed my stuff, prepared my dogs to go on another adventure and headed to the national park of Pyhä-Luosto.

We started at the Rykimäkero parking area and from here we followed the Rykimäkero trail (more information about the trail and how to get there can be found below).

On the trail there is located an amethist mine. If you are planning to bringing it a visit, this trail is a perfect way to get there. But remember to check their website for the opening hours before you make your way there!

By following the trail you will come across different kinds of paths and parts of the forest. One moment your are making your way through the swamp on some duckboards, and the next you are following a dirt road between the trees. But this is what makes the trail so special: the changing scenery makes you experience the different aspect of nature that Lapland has to offer.

During the hike my dogs suddenly got restless. They started sniffing every little leaf and rock that crossed their path, hoping that it will give away the location of the thing that leaves behind a certain scent that they had picked up on. It only took a couple of meters until a reindeer decided to pop out from between the trees. It happens quite often that we come across these beautiful animals during a hike. Sadly, my huskies don’t have the best intentions when meeting these creatures, so we had to move on pretty quickly.

Along the trail there are a lot of shelter places where you can make a fire, enjoy some lunch or just take a little break. Just remember to leave everything the way you found it, without any waste or damage, so we can enjoy these shelters for many years to come!

During one of our breaks a couple of siberian jays decided to give us a little show. They flew from tree to tree and made it look like they were dancing in the sky. Sadly I didn’t have the right equipment to get this photographed. But if you are lucky and quiet, you might experience this as well during your visit!

During my hike there were a lot of ripe bilberries and cloudberries at the side of the trail, so we decided to pick some as a snack and to bring home. My huskies think of the bilberries as nature’s free dogtreat, which makes it a little harder to actually have any berries left to bring home.

Close to the end of our hike we came across the gorge of Rykimäkero. This gorge originated when the rockbed started to tear. It’s a beautiful place to sit down and take some time to admire the power of nature. There is also a shelter, named Rykimäkuru, next to the gorge.

After this our hike came to an end. We were all satisfied by the things we had seen and experienced and can’t wait for the fall colors to start showing. Then we will follow the same trail once again and enjoy the beauty that autumn season gives us.

More information about the Rykimäkero trail and how to get there can be found here >>

I like to use this pdf-map to find my way through the national park. All the shelters and rest places can also be found on this map.