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Off the trail in Pyhä-Luosto National Park

In this episode of the Take a Hike series, we’re exploring the fringe areas of Pyhä-Luosto National Park. The wonderfully well maintained routes offer easy access to the park, but sometimes it’s just as fun to jump off trail and go explore and wonder on your own. The wonderful Lappish nature is in it’s most glorious, bug-free, late autumn shape – and we’re enjoying it to the fullest.

Please note that in Pyhä-Luosto National Park, there are restricted areas where you cannot leave the marked trails – consult your maps or the customer service at Nature Center Naava before you head out! Enjoy the episode!

Follow my adventures also on Youtube and on Instagram!

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Pyhä-Luosto National Park

Winter magic of Lapland on top of Pallas

Lapland. That mystical wonderland in far North. One of the most exciting places in Lapland is a fell named Pallas, or Pallastunturi. Today I’m telling you about my hike to the highest peak of Pallas during winter.

Christmas and new years time is well spent in Lapland. Polar night and Northern lights are the best reality TV for me. What could a photographer enjoy more? I started my journey from the parking lot of Hotel Pallas. The weather was nice and clear. Temperature -20 degrees (celsius) but I wasn’t worried about that. The climb would keep me warm. I was using snowshoes although some people were hiking in winter boots. Start was the easy part and the path was clear.

Wooden cabin

The first point was a small wooden cabin. After that path became steeper and I was glad to have my snowshoes.

One small step…

The view was so amazing that I just had to stop to photograph the landscape every now and then. Slowly rising Sun created colors so unreal.

The view is getting more and more magical

Higher I got, the colder the wind became. Landscape also transformed more arctic.

This way or that way

About 50 meters before the top something unexpected happened. The Sun rose. Just a little bit, but still visibly. During polar winter the Sun should not get up this far North. Later back in the Hotel they told me that the highest peak is high enough for the Sun to reveal itself during clear skies.

WOOW

Here I was, on top of the peak watching this light show. It took me about 2,5 hours to get up there. Then I spent 1 hour just photographing the view. Some people were skiing down the hill but I had my trusted snow shoes. So no fast track down.

“Candyland”

Suddenly I felt like a 7-year-old kid in a candy store. So much “stuff” I had to enjoy before it ends.

Something I will remember all my life

Slowly the Sun started to set. During polar winter the light in the sky is like a 4-hour sunrise/sunset. Then it gets dark again.

Coming down went a bit faster. I was back at the Hotel’s parking lot about 45 minutes later. Temperature was now -25 degrees, but I was still warm enough and my 32 gigabytes memory card full of “candy”.

If you like my photos, please follow me on instagram @anttiphotography. Thank you so much.

Snow creates some interesting shadows.

This is what the Polar Night looks like just before Christmas in Lapland

Tankavaara is a small village in the North-Eastern Lapland. Here the Polar Night has begun in the beginning of December. During summers you can pan for gold in Tankavaara, but in winter this place turns into a winter wonderland!

In the backyard of Tankavaara Gold Village there’s a gate that is a starting point of several nature paths. These paths take you to Urho Kekkonen National Park, and one specific trail is open for winter hiking. It leads to Big Tankavaara Hill (Iso Tankavaara) which opens a beautiful view towards the surrounding wilderness.

I went cross country skiing on this 7-kilometer-long winter trail. I wanted to see how it looks like now, when the Polar night has begun. What Polar night means is that the Sun doesn’t rise at all for a certain period of time in Northern Finland. But it is not completely dark, in fact it brings beautiful shades of blue, pink and yellow to the sky!

I was lucky and run into some reindeer wandering in the wilderness. Aren’t they cute! They looked just like from a Christmas tale.

I walked higher to the Big Tankavaara Hill and saw this magnificent view. I had left my skis to wait at the crossing of the nature trail and the path that leads up to the hill. Unfortunately I should have taken snowshoes with me as well, since the snow got too soft and deep on the top so without snowshoes I couldn’t reach the highest point of the hill.

The Sun doesn’t rise above the horizon but there is some daylight a couple of hours, and the colors are simply beautiful. In Tankavaara the sun rises next time in January.

In the night, if the sky is clear, the stars shine beautifully and the Milkyway is visible. And with a bit of luck it is possible to see the Aurora Borealis. I took the following picture some days ago from this same place on a snowmobile sleigh trip to the fells which is as well available for tourists visiting Tankavaara.

And finally, these pictures of the Milky Way I took on the way home. The camera captures the Auroras and starry sky a little bit different than what the naked eye can see, but still seeing the night sky with your own eyes is breathtaking. I feel lucky to live in such a place!

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The original verion of this article was published on pohjankettu.fi.

What is November like in Lapland?

Polar night has officially begun in the North and the whole of Lapland is already covered with a thick layer of snow. Here are some photos that I have taken during this last month in the areas of Kittilä, Muonio and Sodankylä. I hope you enjoy them – see how beautiful Lapland can be in November!

Above: Sun shining in a snowy forest near Levitunturi fell. In the beginning of November there was still some bright sunlight that we could enjoy. Day by day there was less and less sunshine and now it’s almost completely gone.

Above: Afternoon moments by Jerisjärvi lake. These little houses are very old but fishermen still use them actively – Jerisjärvi is famous for having lots of fish. This was a really cold day: it was -22 degrees celcius or about -8 degrees Fahrenheit.

Above: Some last rays of sunlight make this snowy forest look almost pink. This photo was taken by Kitinen river in Sodankylä.

Above: My friend on top of Levitunturi fell. Levitunturi or Levi is a cool place because it’s easy to reach: a road leads to the top and there’s even a parking lot and a café!

Above: This was a cloudy day, no sunshine whatsoever. I saw a white reindeer walking alone on the ice of Ounasjoki river. The reindeer noticed me as well and looked at me.

Above: Not all waters freeze even during the coldest winter nights. This photo shows what it looks like in Immelkaltio spring near Levitunturi fell.

Above: I took a picture of myself standing in the middle of some beautiful snowy trees. We had had lots of fresh snow the previous day.

Above: a whooper swan on Jerisjärvi lake. There’s a part of this lake that does not freeze – each year there are some whooper swans that decide to stay here instead of heading South. Whooper swan is the national bird of Finland.

Above: In Lapland there’s not much, if any light pollution. That’s why spotting the Milky Way is relatively easy, as long as there are no clouds.

In 10 days everything changed: 12 photos of how winter came to Lapland

I live over 150 km above the Arctic Circle. Here it’s quite common to have snow on the ground in October, but this year the start of the winter was unusually sudden. Here are 12 photos that I have taken during the last ten days – see for yourself how winter arrived!

Above: Frosty morning in a swamp in Kittilä (October 11th). Bog bilberry is one of the last plants to have some beautiful autumn colors. Most plants have dropped their leaves by now.

Above: Nature getting ready for winter in Varkaankuru, Kolari (October 13th).

Above: First snow near Pallastunturi, Muonio (October 14th).

Above: Lake Pallasjärvi is starting to freeze (October 14th).

Above: Swimming in Ounasjoki river (October 16th) only 24 hrs before ice started to appear.

Above: Snowy larch forest in Kittilä (October 18th).

Above: Winter is officially here! About 10 centimeters of snow in Kittilä (October 19th).

Above: Forest river is not ready to freeze just yet (Kittilä, October 19th).

Above: First sunny winter day 2019 in Kittilä. Forest and rocks are covered in snow (October 19th).

Above: Northern lights and the Moon above the frozen Ounasjoki river (October 19th).

Above: There’s still time before the polar night begins, but its colors can already be seen. This photo was taken early in the morning, but in mid winter this is what noon would look like. (October 20th).

Above: Reindeer on a road in Raattama (October 21st).

Waiting for northern lights

As the nights get darker, northern lights can appear again. One night I was waiting for them with my friend. According to the forecast there should have been an amazing light show coming up due to a G2 geomagnetic storm. The auroras should be so bright that they could be seen even in Helsinki, and we were in Lapland! However, the sky was getting cloudy…

Internet and social media are full of beautiful photos of northern lights. However, photographing or even seeing them is not always a peace of cake. Clouds are the biggest problem. Great job if you’re in Lapland and it’s winter – your chances are really good. That’s why I was very optimistic that night.

We made a campfire on our yard and started waiting. The radio was on and we made some tea. But the clouds were coming and I started to wonder if we’re going to see anything at all.

Around 10 pm I took the first photos of the sky. I didn’t see any northern lights yet, but if there’s any light in the sky, the camera can see it even when the naked eye can’t.

And there certainly was something going on.

This was a good time to check that the camera settings were ok for some serious aurora shooting. Maximum ISO and F value, shutter speed about 5 seconds… and focus to infinity. Let’s try with that.

As I was adjusting the camera settings, the sky exploded – but only for a few minutes.

To the naked eye it did not look this green. As I said, cameras can see more than we can. That’s why photographing the auroras is so much fun, it feels like magic!

Before I knew it, the show was over. Reality check: it was way too cloudy.

This is how it can go sometimes – the nature decides whether we can see auroras or not. But nevermind, we had had a great evening anyways!

Autumn is coming to Lapland – this is how it looks, sounds, feels, smells and tastes like

Autumn is about to begin in Lapland – there’s already some beautiful autumn foliage to be seen. But autumn colors are not the only sign of the summer being over. Autumn in Lapland smells like fresh rain in the forest, tastes like berries and sounds like singing swans. You can also see the beautiful starry sky of Lapland for the first time in months. Here are nine signs of nature that tell you autumn is here!

Misty mornings

Autumn is the time of beautiful, cold and misty mornings. You want to get up early so that you won’t miss them!

Nights get darker

This feels very special especially because in Lapland the sun hasn’t set for months. So when it finally does set and the evenings get dark, it feels truly amazing. You can see the stars for the first time after spring, and even some auroras can soon appear!

Autumn foliage

The first ones to begin turning red are bilberries. Make sure that you have a camera with you when you go outside – this is something truly amazing.

Berries get ripe

Bilberries first, then lingonberries and soon also cranberries – they are waiting for you and they are delicious! Thanks to the everyman’s right, anyone is allowed to pick berries in Finland. Just make sure you treat nature with respect and leave nothing behind! Do not litter!

Fresh smell of rain

Who wouldn’t love the smell of a refreshing rain in beautiful nature. In autumn, this smell is at its best. Each forest or swamp has a wonderful smell of its own.

Time for some mushroom picking

Like berries, you can also pick mushrooms. If you’re lucky, you’ll find delicious porcinis or chanterelles!

Chanterelles

Swans get ready to leave

The whooper swan is the national bird of Finland. But they can not stay here for the winter. In autumn you can hear them singing in the wilderness, as they get ready to leave.

Thunder storms appear

Especially in August it’s possible to see and hear some amazing thunder storms and rainbows in Lapland.

Reindeer get handsome again

This might come as a shock, but reindeer get really ugly in the summer when they moult. In August they start to look very handsome again, and the males also have huge beautiful antlers.

P.s. We advice you not to approach male reindeer especially in September, as they can get aggressive during this period of reindeer’s rut.

Best hiking trails in Finnish Lapland

Finnish Lapland is beautiful – and huge. There’s an endless amount of great hiking trails to choose from, but which ones should you choose? Here are our 7 favorites for the summer! On all these trails you have a good chance of seeing not only beautiful landscapes but also reindeer and siberian jays.

Saana fell

Kilpisjärvi

Saana is probably the best-known fell amongst all Finns. This magnificent fell has a beautiful, unique silhouette, and once you get on top of it, the view is something to remember. It’s a 4 kilometer hike to get on top of Saana. Make sure you’re not in a rush: this hike takes time and energy, because it’s literally a rocky road – and a quite steep one as well. Before heading out to the trail, we recommend you pay a visit to the local Nature Centre. There you can get the latest information and useful tips concerning the trail and the weather conditions.

Read more about Saana and other trails in the area

The summit of Saana

Pyhä-Nattanen

Sompio Strict Nature Reserve, Sodankylä

Pyhä or Holy Nattanen is a unique fell in Sodankylä. On top of this fell there are huge rock formations called ‘tors’. There’s also an open day hut where one can rest and maybe have some snacks. The trail to the top is 2 kilometers long. It is located in Sompio Strict Nature Reserve, which means that one is not allowed to leave the marked trail. If you feel like hiking more than 4 kilometers to the top and back, you can also choose to hike a 7 kilometer long loop. The loop has some seriously challenging parts, so make sure you have proper hiking shoes!

Read more about Pyhä-Nattanen

The summit of Pyhä-Nattanen

Isokuru gorge

Pyhä-Luosto national park, Pelkosenniemi

Isokuru is a beautiful summer and autumn destination. It is the biggest gorge in Finland and we promise you: it will take your breath away. There are lots of steep stairs that lead you to the bottom of the gorge. The wooden route then leads you through some astonishingly beautiful landscapes, where there are lots of ponds and beautiful Lappish forests. One of the most beautiful sights is Pyhäkasteenputous waterfall. After the waterfall there’s a new staircase to lead you up to the top of Uhriharju esker. The view from the top is something to remember!

The Isokuru trail is not very long – about 4 kilometers to Uhriharju and back – but it is challenging thanks to all those steep stairs. Also, please note that Isokuru is included in the national park’s restricted access zone, which means that leaving the marked path is prohibited. In winter, this trail is closed and no-one is allowed to go there because of the risk of avalanches.

Read more about Isokuru

Isokuru gorge

Kivitunturi fell

Savukoski

Kivitunturi is an isolated fell near Savukoski village in eastern Lapland. The trail is about 6 kilometers long and there are plenty of things to see, such as an exciting suspension bridge that leads you over Pirunkuru gorge. There’s a lean-to and a campfire place by a beautiful pond called Äitipetäjänlampi. From the top of Kivitunturi fell you can see breathtaking views in all directions, even all the way to Russia.

To learn more about Kivitunturi, please contact Korvatunturi Visitor Center.

Kivitunturi trail

Karhunkierros

Oulanka national park, Salla and Kuusamo

Do you want to challenge yourself? Karhunkierros or The Bear’s Trail is the most legendary hiking trail in Finland, but there’s a catch: it is 82 kilometers long. Karhunkierros leads you to some unbelievably beautiful sights in Oulanka national park in the North-East of Finland. There are lots of open huts, lovely forests, breathtaking views, and true wilderness by this famous trail. Karhunkierros leads you from Ruka to Hautajärvi or vice versa, so it is not a loop.

If 82 kilometers sounds too hard, there’s an excellent option: the Pieni Karhunkierros loop is only 12 kilometers long, but it has several suspension bridges, rapids and gorges. No wonder it is the most popular trail in Finland.

Read more about Karhunkierros (82 km)

Read more about Pieni Karhunkierros (12 km)

There are several suspension bridges on the Bear’s trail.

Hetta-Pallas trail

Pallas-Yllästunturi national park, Enontekiö and Muonio

Hetta-Pallas trail is 55 kilometers long and one of Finland’s most popular hiking trails. It is especially beautiful because it leads you over huge fells with arctic views to remember. This trail leads you from Pallastunturi nature center to the village of Hetta or vice versa. There are several open huts and campfire sites by this legendary trail, but one should always have a tent or a hammock as well, just in case.

Read more about Hetta-Pallas trail

View from the summit of Pallas fell

Ravadasköngäs waterfall

Lemmenjoki national park, Inari

Ravadasköngäs is one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Finland, and it’s located in Lemmenjoki River Valley in Inari. A marked trail follows the river from the small village of Njurkulahti to Ravadasköngas waterfall (16 km). When hiking on this trail you can experience the true magic of Lapland: this is one of Europe’s biggest and most beautiful wilderness areas.

You can also get to Ravadasköngäs by boat from Njurkulahti, if hiking is not your cup of tea. Please remember that Ravadasköngäs is included in the national park’s restricted access zone, so do not leave the marked path.

Read more about Lemmenjoki national park and Ravadasköngäs

Ravadasköngäs waterfall. Photo: Antti Huttunen

If you want to explore these routes or some of the hidden gems of the Laplan with experienced professional wilderness guide, please contact us.

A long ski season with guaranteed snow until May

Every year, the fells of Saariselkä are covered by a layer of fluffy white snow. This ski centre, the northernmost in Europe, boasts a myriad of beautiful slopes, fun sledging hills, well-maintained ski trails and guided treks, guaranteeing a memorable holiday.

Text: Helena Sahavirta, Photos: Panu Pohjola

In Saariselkä, the ski season is guaranteed to last from November to May – perhaps even longer, as in the past the ski centre has opened its doors on three days in June to offer its visitors the memorable experience of skiing on slopes lit by the midnight sun.

The natural snow in Saariselkä is of excellent quality and lasts until late spring on the slopes between two fells, where beginners can find suitable courses and more experienced skiers can try their hands at tricks. Saariselkä also boasts two extra long sledging slopes, one of which is the longest in Finland. On this 1,800 metre run, daredevils can whizz down from the top of Kaunispää all the way to the lower chairlift terminal. The toboggan slope is illuminated with aurora-inspired light art.

In December the sun never rises in Saariselkä, but the ski centre’s well-lit slopes guarantee that the winter fun doesn’t have to stop. The polar night brings its own magical atmosphere to Saariselkä – and the arrival of spring offers another enchanting experience when the days get longer and the April sun glistens on the snow like a thousand diamonds.

Even for visitors who have never experienced snow before, learning downhill skiing, snowboarding, sledging and cross-country skiing is safe and fun with Ski Saariselkä’s professional instructors. To ensure safety, the beginner slopes and other practice facilities have been designed with novice skiers in mind.

The ski resort of Saariselkä boasts about 200 kilometres of well-maintained ski trails, 34 kilometres of which are illuminated. With its vast wilderness area, Urho Kekkonen National Park, situated a stone’s throw from the ski centre, offers great opportunities for cross-country skiing and trekking. A map of the ski trails is available online at infogis.fi/saariselka.

Snowmobile safaris into the wilderness

Playing in the snow comes naturally to children, and the unspoilt, snowy forest often brings out the inner child in many adults too, who find themselves building snowmen and making ‘snow angels’.

For some, on the other hand, snow may be such a novelty that they feel slightly nervous about the unfamiliar conditions. For this reason, Saariselkä’s winter safari organisers often pick up their customers from the hotel or Saariselkä centre and kit them out in warm snowsuits. They also rent outdoor gear such as snowsuits, skis, snowshoes, sliding snowshoes and sleds to DIY travellers, as well as offering ski waxing services. Shops in Saariselkä sell a wide range of winter clothing, from socks and thermal underwear to hats and outerwear.

Lapland Safaris’ most popular excursion, the Aurora Borealis Safari, takes visitors on a hunt for the Northern Lights half an hour’s drive, or an hour’s snowmobile ride, away. Situated by a large lake, the viewing spot, far from any artificial lights, has been selected to maximise the chances of seeing this incredible natural display. Also fat bike treks are organised along snow-covered forest roads to a frozen lake for a spot of ice fishing.

Snowmobile safaris offer adventures in the forest and on the fells.

Northern Lights Village also offers a variety of winter activities, including tuition in cross-country skiing and photographing the Northern Lights. Children over the age of three can put their skills to the test on a children’s snowmobile. In addition to an ordinary restaurant, the hotel boasts a snow restaurant where diners can sample drinks and savour á la carte dishes while seated on ice benches covered with reindeer rugs. The hotel has its own reindeer farm, and visitors can discover a world of Arctic adventures right on the hotel’s doorstep, including snowmobile, reindeer and husky safaris.

Ice fishing on a frozen lake

Joiku-Kotsamo Safaris, run by a local Sámi family, offers a variety of reindeer safaris. Once the ground is covered by a layer of snow, reindeer-pulled sled rides are arranged every evening. On these two-hour outings, you can scan the skies for the magnificent Northern Lights before stopping to warm up by a campfire with some hot drinks. During the day, the reindeer safaris weave their way through snowy pine forests.

In December, when lakes get their ice cover, fishing on a frozen lake makes for a memorable experience. After riding to the lake on a snowmobile, you can fish for Arctic char and grayling through a hole cut in the ice. Your catch is transformed into a mouth-watering fish soup, washed down with coffee brewed on a campfire.

In the daytime, snowmobile safaris, lasting either two or three hours, take visitors to admire the majestic fell scenery, while in the evening the goal is to make an Aurora Borealis sighting. The reindeer farm also has a traditional Lappish log cabin where you can enjoy authentic Sámi delicacies: smoked reindeer, salmon cooked on an open fire and Arctic berries, with the experience completed by Sámi yoik and folktales. Advance booking is required.

Snow safaris arranged by Lapin Luontolomat take visitors through vast northern forests to the shore of a lake, known for its clear water, where they are welcomed by a log cabin, sauna, hot tub, lean-to and a fisherman’s cottage. This spot under starry skies makes for an idyllic setting for ice-fishing and enjoying a candlelit meal by a campfire, while keeping an eye out for the Northern Lights. The open fire is also perfect for grilling sausages.

Local delicacies can also be savoured at the cabin, which seats 50 people and serves lunches and dinners with yoik as an accompaniment. The place, though far from urban noise and artificial lights, is easy to reach by car and snowmobile. For those looking for a real adventure, a longer snowmobile safari to the Russian border is an ideal choice.

With its wide range of activities, Saariselkä offers something for everyone – whether you are in search of action-packed adventures or relaxation amid Lapland’s magical landscapes.

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Inari-Saariselkä – Far in the North

Chasing the Northern Lights

Text and photos: Rayann Elzein

I am going on my eight consecutive winter chasing the elusive Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights, all around Inari, in the very north of Finnish Lapland. Sure, I have also seen the Aurora in Norway and even Greenland, but every single winter I am drawn back to Inari for photography and to help people enjoy this magnificent show of nature. I am often asked “why do you always go back to Inari?” or “why don’t you try somewhere else?”. I always wanted to experience the northern lights, but at first the only thing I knew was that I had to go somewhere north. But where north? So after a long process and weeks of research I set my mind on Inari.

Inari is right under the Aurora oval

The Aurora Borealis appears under a huge doughnut shaped ring that is centred on earth’s magnetic north pole. Without getting too much into the science, this means that if you travel to a location right under the “doughnut”, or Aurora oval, you maximise your chances to see the northern lights, even when the activity is very low.

Inari is located at 68°50’N – 265 km (165 mi) north of the Arctic Circle. This positions Inari right under the ring, almost guaranteeing to see some northern lights on a clear night. This probability based on scientific facts is the most important criteria in my decision to visit Inari and return there so often.

An excellent road network

When you want to see the northern lights, you go “Aurora chasing” with a guide or your own car. In reality, it would be more accurate to say that you are chasing the good weather as you cannot see the Aurora if you are under clouds. Although I am no meteorologist, my personal opinion is that there are often clear nights around Inari. However, if this does not happen during your stay, don’t worry: there are several roads radiating from Inari to all directions. You might even end up on the shore of a fjord in Norway! This makes it very easy to chase the good weather.

Some words of caution: when you are driving yourself, be careful in difficult weather. You also have to be careful of reindeer and elk that are frequently standing or sleeping right in the middle of the road. If you don’t have experience with winter driving, or just want to relax and not worry about anything, then hiring one of the several professional guides is a safer idea.

Much more than just Aurora

There are many places in the world that are located under the Aurora ring but only few of them are inhabited and accessible. Despite being located so far north of the Arctic Circle, Inari-Saariselkä offers a full range of state-of-the-art tourism facilities: comfortable hotels, excellent restaurants, safari companies with a broad range of services. The entire area is also culturally rich, as the home of the Sami people. You can learn a lot about this at the Siida museum. And for a total immersion, an excursion with a reindeer herder will teach you more than any museum (you can even pet the reindeer!)

How to photograph the Aurora

With these few recommendations and just a bit of practice, it is actually quite easy to take some good Aurora photos. A camera with manual mode and a tripod are all that you need. The basic settings that you can use are the following:

  • Sensitivity: +/- 1600 iso
  • Aperture: the largest possible aperture (the smallest number on your lens, i.e. f/2.8-3.5-4)
  • Shutter speed: this one depends on the brightness of the Aurora. Start at 10 seconds and move up or down depending on what you see on your camera screen.

Focussing is the hardest thing to do at night. If you don’t manage to focus on stars, ask someone to stand about 30 meters from you with a flash light, and use auto focus on this light. Then switch to manual focus (MF) and don’t touch this setting anymore.

Tip: practice with your cameras before going out for Aurora, so that you know where all the settings are.

Aurora chasing

A frequent question is how often it is possible to see the Aurora. On a clear night, it is almost always possible to catch at least a glimpse of the northern lights. It might not always be some intense colourful outbursts, but if you are lucky you will see some light dancing in the sky. That’s why I always go out at night if there’s even the slightest chance to find clear sky.

My Aurora chasing usually begins in the early afternoon, when I browse through several weather forecast websites, and exchange text messages with other Aurora chasers all around the region. With this information I make an action plan and will usually start driving around 7 PM. I have often witnessed Aurora in the very early evening, so I like to be in position as soon as it’s dark! During the polar night, this can even be much earlier, like 3 PM or 4 PM.

Once in position, the waiting game begins (unless the Aurora appeared unexpectedly much earlier while still on my way!). Clouds might disturb the view to the stars, so I check the weather forecast once more, and call my friends again to have the latest update of their location. If needed, I will drive again.

The Aurora starts dancing in the sky. I am in my element now. I know how it moves, I anticipate its movements, I can be ready to take the best possible pictures. Sometimes it surprises me, actually quite often, and this is why I never get bored. I always return, and participate in the dance. You might even hear me scream “wow” or something in French. I take photos of my happy guests under the Aurora. I can never decide when to start driving back, because I know that another outburst can always happen. But I know that the Aurora will be there again tomorrow, and we finally drive back to the hotel, with beautiful images in our memory cards, and amazing memories in our minds.

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Inari-Saariselkä – Far in the North