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Spending Time With Autumn

September was amazing and October has thus far been greatly rewarding. Autumn has kicked in, and in my opinion cannot overstay its welcome. Last month I managed to see the northern lights for the first time ever, right here in Joensuu and right above the city. The sunsets have been dramatic and the stars bright. Also, the fog has crept in and turned the routinely visible into the unknown. It’s official, this time of the year is now my favourite.

Here are some moments that I’ve been happy to capture:

Above: Waves crash against some rocks on the shore of Lake Pyhäselkä, Joensuu. The cloudy weather can often bring powerful, dramatic skies to a sunset.

Above: This is a place that I just can’t get enough of. This little island sits just off the shore from Kuhasalo in Joensuu. It’s perfect for if you’re looking to take a good picture. On this particular day the clouds were dramatic, the sun bursted through them and illuminated the island. I also found the green colour on the rocks to be a great foreground interest.

Above: My very first time experiencing the aurora. I went out looking for it, but it was only on my way home that I was treated to a show that I won’t forget. This is not the most amazing photo of the northern lights, but the moment will stay with me forever. The photo was taken in Joensuu, with the church near the centre of the image.

Above: On certain clear nights, the milky way is out to light up the night sky, possibly giving you that feeling of insignificance but simultaneously making you feel immensely grateful to be part of it all.

Above: Onkilampi is a great little lake/pond in Kontiolahti. Every time I go there, this old jetty seems to draw me in. It has a lot of character and appears to have spent its time with many visitors before. This photo was taken on a windy day at sunset.

Above: Another sunset shot on the shores on a lake in Joensuu, Finland.

Above: My second time with the northern lights. I was absolutely amazed at the show I was given. This photo was taken in Kontiolahti.

Above: Autumn has brought with it many different colours. The orange, yellow and red flora starts pop-out and introduce itself in a very bold manner, creating some interesting scenes to take in. Kukkosensaari offers much forest to explore.

Above: Birches lined up in the fog.

Above: A tree in the fog. Finland has been giving me some amazingly foggy scenes to appreciate.

So there you have it. Autumn has so far been fantastic here in Finland. With such a variety of things to see, it makes me wish that winter could somehow delay itself for a little while longer (and I think winter is awesome too). Every day seems full of things to appreciate and photographic opportunities to take. So see you out in the forest and remember to take your camera with you when you go! The Finnish nature is waiting for you 🙂

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Photos from summer

It has been a good summer here in Finland, with lots of warm weather and not too much rain. I’ve had the pleasure of being able to spend some time at a summer cottage in the woods. It also happens to be located very close to an amazing lake. Of course, I always take my camera with. I also spend time in Joensuu and took some photos there.

Above is a photo of mine that most represents my summer this year. It was around midnight, not too dark outside, but just dark enough to make one’s eyes strain while trying to read. The full moon was out, the lanterns were lit, and I thought it would be a good opportunity for a photo. A great time to be in Finland.

Above: A simple sunset in Joensuu. The variety that one gets from day-to-day never disappoints, and I believe that simplicity has it’s place too amongst the more complex sceneries. There are also many shades of orange to appreciate at the right time of day.

Above: A family of trees enjoying an evening at the lake. It almost looks like the one standing alone is contemplating a dip in the water.

Above: Late in the day at the edge of the forest. I often don’t take photos at this time of day, but I just really enjoyed the blue sky and shape of the branches. Nature showing off it’s goods.

Above: Fiery clouds over a lake in Joensuu. The rocks seem to be making their way into the water, each one going deeper.

Above: Unwinding at the end of the day. The wind was blowing like crazy and the glow from the sunlight was intense. Refreshing and almost otherworldly.

Above: Trees glowing in the golden hour. Amazing reflections are a great bonus.

Above: A high contrast, vibrant sunset scene in Joensuu. The sky was wide awake, but the old forest was ready to sleep.

Above: Another rocky shore and of course, another sunset.

I hope that everyone has had a good summer. It’s an amazing time to be in Finland, and it’s also not too long until we get those great autumn colours popping up. Come to think of it, winter is awesome as well 🙂 Enjoy!

Follow me on Instagram: @jason_tiilikainen

The Lakes Are Calling

Over the last few months I’ve been fairly busy with things other than photography, but never too busy for an occasional trip to the water. The Finnish lakes have once again been calling my name and spoiling me with moments of tranquility and a feeling that makes me appreciate life in the greater sense.

I always feel as though something is pulling me into the forest or towards a lake and that I have very little control over it (help?). So in connection with what seems to be a loss of free will to some degree, I have managed to get a few photos over the last few months. Below are some more scenes that Finnish nature has been so kind to bless me with.

Above: A sunset over lake Pyhäselkä in Joensuu, Finland. The weather was windy and clouds were moving through the sky fairly quickly.

Above:​ An ice fisherman leaves the frozen lake after a fishing session. This photo was taken after some heavy snowfall that left all rocks on the shore completely covered.

Above: A splash of sunlight to end the day off spectacularly.

Above: Trails of snow leave interesting formations over the lake.

Above: A maze of snow coating the icy lake surface. This was the first time that I had seen these types of interesting shapes.

Above: Another very long exposure shot with fast moving clouds.

Above: Another shot of the sun hovering over waves of snow. Goodbye for now, my warmest of friends.

Wishing everyone in Finland a great and fun-filled winter. Don’t forget to catch the sunsets!

www.jasontiilikainen.com | Instagram: jason_tiilikainen

Koli national park is one of the most mythical places in all of Finland

The Mighty Koli has been regarded as a sacred area in which the mighty spirits lived. As the area was feared for its powerful spirits, it was inhabited only in the mid 18th century, almost two hundred years later than the surrounding areas. The landscapes in the area are unmatched and thus impressed upon numerous hikers. The Tourist attraction of the area aroused in the late 19th century. It seems that the tradition where a coin will be dropped into an ancient sacrificial crack was also originated around that time.

On the slopes of Koli you will find the longest valley in Finland, ten other famous caves, waterfalls, devils, boulders and a ridge running in the lake of Pielinen, which is visible on the northern side of the lake in form of line of beautiful narrow islands. So, theretrail‘s sights and adventures for a long time.

Arrival and stay

In order to enjoy the best Koli has to offer, you should book a cottage. There is nothing better than relax on a soft bed after full day of adventures.

Find and book your cabin from Koli >>

The closest Bus stop locates in 9 km from Koli. However, it is easy to get to Koli with your own car or by carpooling.

First time at Koli?

For the first time visitors an absolute must-see is the iconic scenery from the top of Ukko-Koli. It is only 0.8 km hike to the top, and the nearby observation deck can also be accessed with the prams. However, Koli National Park offers a lot more. You can hike the Herajärvi Round, which is 30 or 60 kilometers depending on your preferences. The National Park is full of trail options for both in summer and winter.

  • Route to Ukko- and Akka-Koli both takes only 0.8km in one direction. Both trails starts from the Nature Center are partially accessible with prams.
  • Paha-Koli 1.2km in one direction
  • Top tour is a 1.4km long circle trail. An easy-going classical trail in Koli’s most iconic scenery. Starts from the Visitor Center.
  • Kolinuurros is 3.5 km long circle trail. A Demanding but a spectacular trail with high altitudes.

Explore Koli in winter

  • Trail of the Koli peaks are 3 and 7 km circle ski trails in winter scenery.
  • Snow-Shoeing: The snowshoe route of the highest point, 1.5 km, runs with the peaks of Ukko, Akka and Paha-Koli.
  • Walk: Trail to the top of Ukko-Koli is 400m and starts from the radiotower
  • Ski: Koli’s ski slopes are located near high peaks. Along with the slopes there are plenty of services for the traveler.
  • Snow mobile: The snowmobile route passes through Koli village to Pielinen, which continues to the Juuka, Nurmes, Lieksa and Joensuu. In the national park, snowmobiling is prohibited, including in the islands of the park.

Read more about Koli in English here.

Some summer moments

So as some of you might know, I absolutely love being near Finnish lakes. I ended up spending a lot of time this summer in the Finnish nature, particularly in Joensuu. Since I live close to the nature there, it’s really easy to just get on my bike and cycle to the lake or forest.

I also started making some videos this summer about exploring Finnish nature and practicing my photography (you can find them on www.jasontiilikainen.com). Anyways, here are some of the photos that I took this summer.

Pictured above is a small, lonely island soaking in the last bit of sunlight for the day. I went exploring on a few different islands this summer, and this lovely scene really caught my attention.

​Above​ is a shot that I took after rushing around on a lake by boat, trying to find the perfect place before the sunset. I managed to find this really nice place. I then waited for sunset and took the shot.​

In the picture above, I was exploring the shore of a lake in Joensuu. I found this nice little piece of driftwood just sitting around. I moved it slightly so that it would compliment the composition that I wanted, and then I took the shot just after the sun went down behind the horizon.

Above is a photo that I took in the forest. It was still about an hour or two before sunset, so I got some lovely sunlight coming into the forest from behind the trees. I love how green it gets here in Finland. Everything always looks so fresh and alive. The forest also has a really nice relaxing smell to it.

This sky in the above picture was amazing to behold. Being there and seeing this dreamy pink/purple colour in the clouds just felt completely out of this world. It was also really windy, and the clouds were moving really fast, giving it even more of a dramatic effect. Moments like these don’t happen every day in Finland, but when they do, they are amazing to witness.

Sometimes its difficult to concentrate on taking photos when you have mesmerising moments like this one shown in the picture above. The weather was at first incredibly cloudy, almost overcast, but after a while the clouds started to break apart. After breaking apart, I was left with a sky that truly amazed me. The formations and shapes in the clouds really complimented the simplicity of the foreground.

Pictured above is me standing on a rock at the end of the day. I had just finished doing my photography, and thought I’d take this picture just for fun.

I hope everyone has a great autumn! I’m sure the colours will be amazing as usual, and that there will be tons of amazing photographs to look at. Bye for now!

The magical landscape of Koli is the most Finnish view ever

People say that what you can see from the top of Ukko-Koli hill is the most famous view in Finland.

You can find this breathtaking place in the easternmost part of Finland, in Koli national park in Lieksa.

Many artists used to come here at the end of 1800’s and early 1900’s to immortalize this spectacular natural landscape. Nowadays widely known and highly esteemed Finnish artist Eero Järnefelt (1863–1937) spent a lot of time in Koli, wandering around and searching for new spots to sit down and create new paintings. And, boy, did he find them! He was a master to describe Koli’s surrounding by paints.

This is where Eero Järnefelt made a painting called Metsälampi (Forest pond).

Today tourists from all over the world come to visit Koli to see these places that are well-known from Järnefelt’s works. Yesterday’s art became today’s advertisement.

You can climb up Ukko-Koli hill, which is the most visited place in Koli. On the highest point you can admire Lake Pielinen right there under your nose. All those green islands and endless blue water under the blue sky and white clouds… That has to be the most Finnish view there is.

There is also an observation tower called Räsävaara nearby Koli village. If you dare to climb up, the view from up there is really stunning!

From the tower you are able to see all around Koli: the Koli hill queue, Lake Pielinen and other smaller lakes and ponds. I think that this really is Finland’s most beautiful national landscape!

MAP.

Read more about Koli here and Koli National Park here.

Symphonic metal band Nightwish inspired by the backwoods

We share the same ancestors as the birch tree, from which this firewood was taken. That is the world’s most beautiful fact. Understanding how everything is connected, could provide an important insight into the well-being of mankind.

In the belly of a dark tipi-like hut, a bright fire hisses and crackles. Trees exhale their final breaths as gentle heat and smoke. Afternoon November rain taps on the roof.

Tuomas Holopainen is celebrating the sabbath. 20 years of Nightwish and a tour lasting a year and a half are now behind him.

‘I asked the band, what if we take a little breather after the tour. It would probably do our heads some good’, Tuomas explains.

‘Everybody thought it was a sound idea’, and now here we are.

The legacy of the backwoods.

At primary school, Tuomas was a lone wolf.

‘I didn’t have a lot of friends, but I didn’t want a lot either. At my childhood home I spent all my days in the local woods or the field. Frodo and Bilbo and Huey, Dewey and Louie were the best of the bunch.

The lonely days of childhood were not lonely in the negative sense. I made up imaginary friends, forest trolls and gnomes, and that took me into the forest everyday, I felt extremely happy there.’

Tuomas was not cut out to live in the city. At one point he studied biology and lived in Kuopio for half a year. That was enough urban life for him.

‘People often like things they’ve had exposure to as a child. And I’ve lived my whole life in Kitee in the middle of the forest. That’s something that’s always stayed with me, the desire to stay near the forest and the lake.’

Nature roars

When in nature, Tuomas hears music. During his daily forest walks, nature can inspire a part of a melody, the subject of a song, a phrase or some other idea. It won’t leave him alone.

‘There comes this need to get it out. The need to make it something concrete. And that need is like an unimaginable roar in the head’, Tuomas explains.

There is something intriguingly recognisable about the Finnish melody, chord structure and all-encompassing melancholy. Tuomas also describes Nightwish’s music as organic and thinks that he would be making a completely different kind of music if he had grown up in a big city.

‘There’s no denying that it’s a huge part of Nightwish’s identity, the fact that all band members are originally boys and girls from the countryside. It brings with it a certain amount of healthy naivité, innocence and good-natured childishness’.

Nature is also a perfect antithesis to the unrelenting torrent of the social media world.

‘I even notice in myself that I always have a phone in my hand or am sitting at a computer. It’s very difficult to stop and then when I do, I start to wonder if I’m being useful, why am I not doing anything, should I be achieving something in this performance-driven society?’

In the forest or on the lake shore, that feeling disappears.

‘At first I might feel that I really should be doing something. Why am I just sitting still or walking? But then I realise that there is no need for anything else.’

Our common ancestor

Nightwish’s Sacrament of Wilderness tells of how humans once tamed the wolf. The latest album, Endless forms most beautiful, is devoted entirely to nature and science, the miracles of life: evolution.

Tuomas reveals that making the record was a virtually spiritual experience for him.

‘Evolution is self-evident, but when reading Dawkins, I understood the poetry that is within that self-evidence. And it was an overwhelming experience to understand that every living being on this planet is our cousin, that we all have a common ancestor. We have a direct line of almost 4 billion years into the past’, Tuomas says.

‘Just think, your dad, his father and his father, that line doesn’t break for 4 billion years. The fact that we are descendants of survivors is quite an understatement.’

Tuomas points to the campfire.

‘The birch tree, from which that firewood has been taken, shares the same ancestor as us. These are facts, and to me this is the most beautiful fact in the world. It could be a very important insight into the well-being of mankind, if we could understand that everything is connected, that man is not above everything, but part of it’, Tuomas considers.

‘We couldn’t get all that across on one album, so we might have to continue.’

Acoustically on Ukko-Koli?

A couple of great travel fantasies of Tuomas’s are yet to be realised. The biggest of them is Alaska.

‘I have a strange fixation. Just the word, it has something mystical. And then one of my all-time favourite films, Into The Wild, fuelled that desire even more. I must get there one day, with a guide, so that I don’t end up as bear food’, ponders Tuomas.

For years he has also dreamed of spending a month in Lapland, away from people.

‘And I won’t leave for a month. There, I will be alone. I want to experience the isolation and that feeling of loneliness. And some of that survival spirit. One month’s gear in a backpack and that’s what I’ll survive with. This is something I definitely want to do some time.’

Tuomas has drawn music from nature, and he wants to combine the two in a way that hasn’t been done before.

‘I think it would be a really tempting idea to play acoustically from the top of Koli or somewhere else in nature. It would require a lot of work, but could be a suitably challenging arrangement project.’

Rain and sleet, cold and harsh winds

At the end of the summer Tuomas plans to hike. Staring at the fire, eating and drinking – enjoying the basic things in life in his favourite landscape, Finnish Lapland. The man says he’s never had a big urge to go anywhere else.

‘When I go hiking, I don’t like walking 3 km per day and then sleeping in wilderness huts. In my opinion you can and should stink of sweat. Experience the rain and sleet, the cold and harsh winds. With that you go through some kind of catharsis, inner cleansing’, thinks Tuomas.

He likes to hike with friends – his traditional hiking friends are Tony Kakko and Timo Rautiainen, both well-known Finnish artists.

‘We have a week booked in August, so we’re going to revive our hiking guild. We will also have foreign friends on that trip, who have never been to Finland, but who want to hike, so we’re going to take them along’, says Tuomas.

‘Just as it says in my favourite film, Into The Wild, happiness is only real when shared.’

The Water Is Back!

After taking many photos throughout the winter here in Finland, it’s nice to finally see some liquid water again. It’s quite amazing to see the transitions in nature as the seasons change, and I really recommend visiting Finland within the next few months as the weather warms up. The spring/summer season is really nice here, as it’s often warm and the forests become amazingly green and lush.

Below are some photos that I’ve taken recently, right after the lakes have thawed or are busy thawing.

The water slowly starts to show as the weather warms up.

The remains of some ice float on a lake as the weather continues to rise.

Only a bit of snow remains along the shore.

The last lonely piece of ice sits on a lake at sunset.

The sun sets over a recently thawed lake in Joensuu. No more ice or snow!

Have a great summer everyone!

Finland’s Frozen Lakes

As winter approaches in Finland, it’s quite interesting to see how the lakes change in appearance. In the warmer months, the water looks crystal clear, but as winter approaches, the water becomes more icy and eventually turns into what looks like a snowy desert.

First the lake water slowly cools and starts to freeze, leaving thin layers of ice on the water.

Then the water gets more and more icy.

In these pictures, larger pieces of ice wash up to the shore.

Later on in winter, a thick layer of ice is formed on the surface of the water.

Snow then falls on top of the ice, leaving what looks like a snowy desert.

The pictures above were taken in Joensuu, Finland.

Winter fairy tale land – Koli

You don’t have to go all the way to Lapland to find beautiful winter landscapes. In North-Karelia you can find the most highest place of South-Finland. In the fell Koli you can find it’s peaks Ukko-Koli, Akka-Koli and Paha-Koli. People believe that these peaks got their name’s from powerful ancient gods.

You can use snowshoes or ski’s to get to the top of Koli. There is also a hotel and Koli National Park‘s nature center in the top. After hiking in the hills you can get a cup of coffee for example in the nature center Ukko’s cafeteria.

When the sky is clear, you can see lake Pielinen from the Koli hills. When the sky is misty, you just have to enjoy the magical spruce forests with snow and hard rime that accumulates on tree branches.

Old forests look magical in winter time. Village under the hills can be without snow on the trees, but when you climb up to the fell, usually you can find beautiful trees with snow and ice on them.

Finnish artists, photographers and nature-lovers have been inspired with this heritage landscape for centuries. Usually people say, that you should go to the Koli, when the sky is clear and sunny. I think you should definitely visit Koli in a foggy day also.

When almost everything is white, you start to realize, that it’s not really white. It’s blue, it’s purple, it’s orange and colors are changing sometimes really fast. Some camera’s go crazy and it’s difficult to capture the real color of the forests. But who know’s, what’s real and what’s unreal?

Some part’s of the trails are without winter maintenance, but usually paths are walked open by people, so you can even go walking there just with your winter shoes. Don’t hesitate to ask advice’s from nature center’s helpful workers.